Vegetable Seeds: Which to Sow Outdoors vs. Indoors?

A close up of a small rustic green cabinet surrounded by baking paper containing seeds ready for planting. To the left of the frame are some biodegradable seed starting pots and a pair of gloves.

Some vegetable seeds should be sowed directly in the garden – while others are more successful when started indoors, and transplanted later. Find a list of which veggies are which, understand the reasons behind these guidelines – and learn about some exceptions you should know about, too. Read on to learn more now.

29 of the Best Lettuce Varieties For Your Garden

A close up of eight different varieties of lettuce, from tight headed iceberg to frilly red cultivars, set on a wooden board on a white surface.

Lettuce is an easy to grow, nutritious addition to your vegetable patch. There are lots of cultivars available in a variety of sizes, shapes, colors, and textures. From the classic crunch of the crisphead to the delicate, tender oak leaf, there’s sure to be one to suit you. Discover 29 of our favorite lettuce varieties.

Broccoli Buttoning: What Causes Multiple Tiny Heads?

A close up of two hands cupping a mature broccoli head, in between large, leafy green foliage on a white background.

Broccoli isn’t the easiest cruciferous vegetable to cultivate. It needs cool weather and a host of other favorable growing conditions. Sometimes, instead of one large, compact head, multiple small ones called buttons develop. Learn why this happens, and what measures you can take to avoid it, here on Gardener’s Path.

How to Grow Rhubarb from Seed

A close up of a rhubarb plant growing in the garden with bright red stalks and green foliage, in light sunshine, with rich earth around the base of the plant, fading to soft focus in the background.

Rhubarb is a stunning addition to everything from wine to pie to roasted chicken. Most gardeners know that you can propagate the tart, lightly sweet plant from crowns, divisions, and bare roots. But can you sow rhubarb seeds? Will they grow successfully? And if so, how do you do it? Read on to learn more now.

When and How to Harvest Rhubarb

A close up of two hands holding a bunch of freshly picked Rheum rhabarbarum stalks, some of them are green and others light red, on a soft focus background/

Are you wondering when and how you should harvest rhubarb stalks for the best flavor without harming the mother plant? You won’t want to miss this guide, where you’ll learn exactly when to harvest whether you grow it from seed, crown, bare root, or division. We’ll also show you how to preserve stalks. Read more now.

How to Grow Rhubarb in Containers

A small rustic wooden table with three pots containing maturing rhubarb plants with pink stems and bright green foliage, pictured in bright sunshine with a garden scene in soft focus in the background.

Growing rhubarb in containers gives you a head start on enjoying sweet, tart stalks in pie, jam, ice cream, coffee cake, and even wine. It’s also a fun project to do indoors during the throes of winter, just when it seems as though spring is an eternity away. You don’t want to miss our step-by-step guide! Read more now.

What Is the Difference Between Broccoli Rabe and Broccolini?

A close up of a floret and the foliage of broccoli rabe growing in the garden in light sunshine.

Is there a difference between broccolini and broccoli rabe? Or are they the same? These two veggies look a lot alike and have similar names. But they are different – in their origins, how they grow in the garden, and how you’ll want to use them in the kitchen! To learn what distinguishes these two veggies, keep reading.

13 of the Best Rhubarb Varieties for the Garden

A close up of the red stalks of the rhubarb plant growing in the garden, with bright green foliage on a soft focus background.

Rhubarb pie melts in your mouth, but you can use pie plant in jams, cake, ice cream, and more. And there are plenty of varieties from tart to sweet and everywhere in between to satisfy your cravings. We round up thirteen of the best rhubarb varieties for you to grow in your garden this season. Learn more now.

Why Is My Cauliflower Fuzzy? Troubleshooting Tips for Ricing in Curds

A close up of a cauliflower head that has gone fuzzy around the edges, a condition known as ricing, pictured amongst dark green foliage.

Cauliflower is one of the more difficult cool-weather crops to grow. If climate, soil, and moisture conditions are not ideal, the curd may not mature as it should. Sometimes, instead of being smooth, it looks fuzzy. Learn what causes this, how to avoid it, and if the affected crop is edible. Read more now.