What Causes Turnips to Crack or Rot?

A close up horizontal image of gloved hands pulling a fresh turnip root out of the ground. In the background are other mature plants pictured in soft focus.

You fertilized, watered, and fussed over your turnips for weeks, and it’s time to pull them from the ground. But instead of perfectly-shaped roots, you find cracked, split, or rotten ones instead. What went wrong? What could you have done differently? Read on to learn what causes these issues and how to prevent them.

Health Benefits of Turnip Greens

A close up horizontal image of freshly harvested turnip greens set on a wooden surface.

Turn up your diet quality with turnip greens! This leafy vegetable packs in a powerful nutritional punch. Turnips are best known for their roots, but don’t forget to keep the tops too! Adding the homegrown greens to salads or sauteing them with aromatics offers many robust health benefits. Read on to learn more.

How to Harvest Turnips

A close up of a bunch of freshly harvested turnips on soil in the sunshine. The roots are round and bulbous and the green stems and foliage are still attached.

Think it might be time to harvest your turnip crop, but you’re not quite sure of how to proceed? Luckily, harvesting turnips is easy with a little gardening know-how. Read more now to learn how and when to harvest homegrown turnip roots and greens, plus the best storage practices and some bonus recipe ideas.

How to Control Turnip Mosaic Virus

Close up of cabbage leaves infected with the Turnip Mosaic Virus.

Turnip mosaic virus affects cabbage and a broad range of cole crops along with many other types of plants. Weeds serve as reservoirs for the disease, which is spread by aphids. Read on to learn how to control this potentially devastating disease.

How to Control White Leaf Spots on Cruciferous Vegetables

Top down view of a turnip leaf infected with white leaf spot (Cercospora brassicicola).

White spot fungi are selective in the crucifers they infect and cause disease on the leaves of turnip, rutabaga, canola, mustard, radish, and horseradish. The fungi overwinter on volunteer plants and cruciferous weeds. Read on to learn how to control white spot fungus on crucifers.

How to Plant and Grow Turnips for Roots and Greens

Looking for a versatile, nutritious, and easy to grow cole crop to plant in your garden this season? There is a reason that the turnip has been a staple of the human diet for centuries! Learn more about how to grow and care for this historic crop right here on Gardener’s Path.

What’s Eating My Turnips? How to Eradicate Turnip and Rutabaga Pests

Turnip and rutabaga plants can be severely infested by several types of insects. While row covers can prevent some of these infestations, wireworms are soil-borne threats that can cause the end of the season’s crop in an infested field. Read on to learn how to manage cabbage aphids, root maggots, flea beetles, sawflies, and more.

How to Stop Turnips from Bolting and Going to Seed

Close up of a turnip forming a flower head to produce seed.

Can’t understand why your turnip crop keeps bolting? Bolting is caused by stress on plants and can be easily addressed with a few simple tricks. Learn what factors can cause bolting in turnips and explore some ways that you can prevent your turnip crop from bolting. Read more now.

How to Identify and Treat Diseases of Turnips and Rutabagas

Close up of a turnip plant with diseased leaves.

Fungi, bacteria, and water molds cause multiple types of diseases on the leaves or roots of turnips and rutabagas. In addition, turnip mosaic virus is a debilitating disease. You can prevent many diseases by using clean or heat-treated seeds. Read on to find out what symptoms to look for on your crops.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Bacterial Leaf Spot on Turnip Crops

Close up of a turnip leaf showing bacterial leaf infection.

Bacterial leaf spot on turnip can be caused by two different types of bacteria. This disease spreads easily and can be very difficult to control. Preventing the pathogens from becoming established is the best way to protect your turnip crop. Read on to learn how to protect your plants from these bacteria.

How to Identify and Treat Turnips With Downy Mildew

Downy mildew (Peronospora parasitica) infection on a turnip leaf underside. Black background.

Cool, wet conditions favor downy mildew infection on turnips. Not only can the pathogen destroy the leaves, but it can also spread into the root and cause the turnips to crack. Fall crops are particularly susceptible to this fungus-like organism. Read on to learn how to prevent and control this disease.

How to Identify and Treat Alternaria Leaf Spot on Turnips

Close up of half a tunip leaf infected with Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria brassicicola or brassicae).

Species of the fungus Alternaria can infect your turnips, causing leaf spots and spreading to the seed pods. There are a number of methods to prevent this disease, and both microbial and synthetic fungicides that will control it. To learn how to prevent and control this disease, read more now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Identify and Control Turnip Black Rot

Close up of a turnip leave showing splotchy areas indicative ofbBlack rot (Xanthomonas campestris)

Black rot of turnips caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is a devastating bacterial disease that is easily spread. Since it is very difficult to control, preventing it from becoming established is your best bet. Read on to learn how to keep your turnips from becoming infected with black rot.

How to Identify and Prevent White Rust on Turnip

White rust (Albugo candida) on Turnips. Close up.

White rust infects cruciferous plants, including turnips, around the world. It produces white pustules on the leaves and can distort the flower heads. However, this organism does not kill the plants. Read on to learn how to prevent white rust using cultural control methods.