23 Beneficial Insects and Other Creepy Crawlies That Your Garden Will Love

Did you know that not all insects are pests? Many beneficial varieties may already be living in your gardens, helping to control populations of bugs that enjoy feasting on veggies, herbs, and flowers. Read on to discover who your friends are, and how to encourage them to work and thrive in your yard.

The Art of Cover Cropping: Sustainable Care for a Happy Garden

A close up horizontal image of red clover planted in a field as a cover crop with blue sky in the background.

Cover crops offer a smart and sustainable way to produce healthy, vibrant soil for robust, happy plants without using synthetic fertilizers. They also control erosion, suppress weeds, bust pest cycles, and improve water retention. Learn all about the art and science of beneficial cover cropping right here.

The Scientifically-Backed Benefits of Companion Planting

A close up horizontal image of marigolds growing the garden, companion planted with vegetables.

You may have already learned many great companion plant combinations, but do you understand the science behind why they work? From controlling pests to preventing soil erosion, companion planting is a key element among organic backyard gardening practices. Read our guide on the benefits of companion planting now.

How to Use Beneficial Nematodes to Reduce Pests in Your Garden

Top down view of various beneficial nematodes view through a microscope.

Beneficial nematodes may be used to control soilborne insects in their larval and nymph stages. These tiny, worm-like organisms penetrate the body of their host, introducing a strain of bacteria that kills the host insect. Learn how to use beneficial nematodes for garden pest control in this guide. Read more now.

Planting Your First Vegetable Garden: A Beginner’s Guide

Colorful vegetable garden with marigolds for companion planting.

If you’re new to the world of vegetable gardening, you’re in for a treat! Fresh veggies have a flavor that can’t be beat, and they’re healthy and nutritious. Plus, growing your own is friendly on the budget, and gardening is an excellent way to reduce stress. Learn all about these positive benefits right here on Gardener’s Path.

The Ultimate Guide to Understanding Garden Soil

A close up of a potato fork stuck in the dirt in a garden setting.

Ready to learn how to get the most beautiful and productive results from your garden? Our article gets to the root of the problem. The soil type in your yard is the key to happy plants. From woodland to seashore and acid to alkaline, this piece will guide you to success. Read more on Gardener’s Path.

Plant Nutrients: What They Need and When They Need It

Cover Crop Nutrients | GardenersPath.com

Did you know that appearance, disease, growth stage, and more reveal what nutrients plants need? Like us, plants need a wide range of nutrients, and they can gain them from many sources. Learn how to master plant nutrients, diagnose deficiencies, and restore balance here at Gardener’s Path!

Composting Autumn Leaves: How to Use Leaves for Compost and Mulch

A close up horizontal image of a wheelbarrow with fresh compost in the garden, with a fork to the right of the frame, pictured in light sunshine.

When life gives you leaves, why not make compost? Autumn’s falling leaves are perfect for making a well-balanced compost bin. Often treated as “waste,” dead leaves are a valuable natural resource that you can turn into black gold for your garden. To learn how to create compost and mulch with fall leaves, keep reading.

How and When to Compost Tomato Plants

A close up of a garden fork stuck in a gray plastic backyard compost bin, containing garden waste, pictured in bright sunshine.

Whether or not to compost tomatoes is a controversial topic in the gardening world. Fears that composting tomatoes will encourage pathogens, create messes, and cause trouble the following season lead many gardeners to trash their plants. Read on to examine these concerns and learn how to safely compost tomato plants.

How to Use Eggshells in the Garden for Soil, Compost, and as Pest Control

A close up of shells of eggs mixed in with rich, dark soil in the garden.

Want to use eggshells in your garden? Learn the best techniques for breaking them down in your compost and using them as a soil amendment. And find out the truth about whether eggshells really repel garden pests. To learn more about turning eggshells into garden amendments instead of landfill waste, read more now.

Growing Borage as a Cover Crop and for Green Manure

A close up of a patch of Borago officinalis growing in the garden with blue flowers contrasting with the green foliage, pictured in bright sunshine.

Ready to learn some new gardening uses for your beloved borage? This blue-flowered herb can be grown as a cover crop to improve your garden in a number of ways, from soil amendment to pest protection, and it can even be used as a green manure. Discover how to grow borage as a cover crop in your garden. Read more now.

Using Pheromones to Control Insects in Your Garden

A close up of a green plastic insect trap hanging from a tree in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Sex appeal comes in all shapes and sizes, but in insects, it’s often rooted in trace amounts of a pheromone. Gardeners and growers use this to their advantage by luring and trapping the males or preventing them from finding their mates. Read on to learn how to use these hormones to control pests in your garden.

How to Make and Use Comfrey Tea Fertilizer

A close up of freshly harvested leaves to make comfrey tea fertilizer set on green grass.

If you don’t like the idea of pouring expensive and harmful chemical fertilizers all over your garden then try making a homemade liquid fertilizer using comfrey. Homemade comfrey tea fertilizer is an organic, easy, and completely free way to feed your plants and recycle nutrients back into your soil. Read more now.

How to Naturally Kill Insects on Kale: The Best Organic Solutions

A Brassica oleracea plant, seen from above, with its leaves chewed and destroyed, only small fragments of them remaining on the plant. Instead of being bright green, it is a dull yellow color. In the background is soil and other damaged foliage.

Don’t let your kale get overrun with pests. If you’re growing kale in your vegetable garden there’s a good chance you’ve got some insects damaging your plants. If they get out of control you’ll want to take action. Learn how to identify who’s chomping on your greens and kill these bugs naturally. Read more now.

How to use Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to Control Insect Pests

A pump sprayer is being used in a backyard setting to apply Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to control insect pests.

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a microbial insecticide that is highly specific for certain kinds of insects and safe against people and non-target animals. Certain strains control caterpillars, mosquitoes, black flies, and a few kinds of beetles. Read on to learn how to use this novel but natural insecticide.

Controlling Plant Pathogens With the Biofungicide Bacillus subtilis

Close up of a graphic in green showing a microscopic view of the biofungicide bacillus subtilis.

Bacillus subtilis can control a range of fungal and bacterial pathogens in the soil and on leaves. It directly inhibits other microbes and also stimulates the plants to control pathogens using their own natural resistance mechanisms. Read on to learn more about these versatile bacteria.

Trichoderma Improves Plant Growth and Kills Fungal Pathogens

A micro view showing light green Trichoderma Fungi.

Trichoderma harzianum T-22 is a highly developed fungal strain that effectively controls a number of fungal pathogens of plants. This fungus colonizes plant roots and does not affect other beneficial microbes like mycorrhizae or Rhizobium. Read on to learn more about this fascinating organism now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Use Streptomyces lydicus to Control Fungal Plant Diseases

A microscopic vie of the Streptomyces bacteria.

The bacteria Streptomyces lydicus colonize plant roots and protect them against fungi and bacteria that cause disease. They can also be sprayed on plant leaves to control foliar pathogens. These bacteria are safe for people and beneficial insects. Read on to learn how they work and how to use them in your garden.

How to Start Annuals Indoors from Seed

How to Start Annuals Indoors | GardenersPath.com

Are you itching to get into the garden, but it’s still too cold outside? Satisfy your craving to play in the dirt by starting seeds indoors. With an egg carton and potting medium, you can grow flowers, herbs, and vegetables to transplant outside when the weather warms. Learn how on Gardener’s Path.

Make These Easy DIY Raised Beds: The Perfect Solution for Veggie Gardening

A wooden garden planter box filled with brown soil, with a few green seedlings growing in the planter.

For vertical gardens, leafy greens, and especially root crops, or if you simply want improved soil and drainage, a raised bed is the best option. But buying these from the store can really make you question the frugality of gardening. Check out this simple plan to build a small, economical version. Read more now.

The Benefits of Raised Bed Gardening

Wooden Raised Beds | GardenersPath.com

Raised beds are excellent for those with hard clay or soils with too much sand. They assist with drainage for climates with too much rain and help retain moisture for those who don’t get enough. And they are ideal for those with back and knee problems. Read more about the benefits of these gardening enclosures now!

How to Start Worm Farming: Adventures in Composting and Vermiculture

Shovel Holding Worms | GardenersPath.com

Are you looking to recycle your food trash and improve your garden soil at the same time? Trhy vermicomposting, Grow your own earthworms and turn your food trash into valuable compost that can be applied straight to your plants or made into a manure tea! Find out all you need to know now!

Teaming with Microbes: A Fresh Review for Today’s Gardeners

Close up of a white beneficial fungus spreading across the soil.

Teaming With Microbes was a landmark guide for raising awareness of the soil food web in 2006 – and promoting more environmentally aware, chemical-free gardening techniques – fueling an organic food revolution. Does it still apply today? Read more on Gardener’s Path now, and find out why you should toss out those chemical pesticides and fertilizers!

The Basics of Composting

Compost with Kitchen Scraps | GardenersPath.com

Have you decide to make the jump to a more organic lifestyle & want to know how to recycle your kitchen waste into compost? Read our guide and find out.

Organic Gardening 101: How to Get Started

Person in a green t-shirt, khakis, and a short-sleeved blue denin shirt kneels behind a wooden box containing organically grown vegetables.

Tired of applying chemical fertilizers and pesticides to your garden? Switch to all organic methods and you’ll reap the benefits of a more productive and healthy soil and better quality fruits and vegetables. Read how now.