How to Prevent Bok Choy from Bolting

A close up horizontal image of a bee feeding from the yellow flowers of a brassica that has bolted pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Have you ever grown bok choy only to see it bolt in cold or hot weather, or for reasons you didn’t understand? In this guide, we’ll dig into the top reasons why bok choy goes to seed, and we’ll give you tips for how to prevent it. Plus, if it does happen, we’ll show you what to do with bolted bok choy. Read more now.

Must-Have Companion Plants for Mustard Greens (and What Not to Plant Nearby)

A close up horizontal image of mustard greens growing in the garden.

Do mustard greens make good vegetable garden neighbors? If you’re growing corn or dill, sure! But choose mustard green companion plants carefully – these quick-growing veggies don’t always play nice with others. Learn about the top companions, plus a few tips on what to keep away in this guide. Read more now.

When and How to Harvest Bok Choy

A close up horizontal image of two hands holding a wicker basket filled with freshly harvested pak choi pictured on a soft focus background.

If you’re growing bok choy in your garden, you might be feeling a bit confused about when you should pick the tasty green leaves with their succulent white or green stems. How big should they be? Can you harvest bok choy early? Discover when and how to harvest bok choy for the best results in our guide. Read more now.

Bok Choy Spacing: How Far Apart to Plant Your Crop

A close up horizontal image of bok choy plants growing in rich soil in the garden.

Bok choy, or pak choi, is a Chinese cabbage with green or white stalks and green leaves that is a staple of Asian-style cooking. Choose from dwarf and full-size varieties, and harvest young for tender microgreens. Read on to learn how far apart to space seeds and nursery seedlings, and bring in your best harvest yet.

How to Grow Tasty Turnip Greens at Home

A close up horizontal image of a white plate of turnip greens set on a gray surface.

The roots get most of the attention, but let’s take some time to talk turnip tops. These easy-to-grow greens are perfect for cool weather gardening, so you can have your veggies even when the traditional growing season is ending. They’re versatile in the kitchen, too. Eat them braised, raw in salads, or cooked in soup.

How to Grow Broccoli Rabe

A close up horizontal image of broccoli rabe florets and foliage.

Broccoli rabe is a cool season veggie that will spice up your spring or fall harvest with its compelling flavor profile. It’s easy to sow directly from seed and is a fast grower, so when planning a diverse assortment of leafy greens for your homestead or garden, don’t forget tasty rapini. Keep reading to learn more.

How to Grow Mizuna Asian Mustard Greens in the Garden

A close up horizontal image of the bright green leaves of mizuna mustard greens growing in the garden.

Healthy harvests of the Asian green mizuna are just weeks away when you follow these gardening tips. This mild mustard green is great for impatient gardeners and those with short growing seasons. You’ll enjoy the baby leaves 21 days from sowing, and full-size greens three weeks later. Quick and tasty, that’s mizuna.

How to Control Cabbage Loopers

A close up horizontal image of a Trichoplusia ni larvae moving along a leaf and munching holes in it as it goes.

Cabbage loopers may look like harmless inchworms but their voracious munching can damage many crops in your garden including kale, turnips, cabbage, and broccoli. There are a number of methods that you can use to manage these caterpillars. Learn how to identify and control cabbage loopers in this guide.

How to Regrow Bok Choy from Scraps

Bok choy cuttings placed on windowsill.

Did you know that you can regrow bok choy from kitchen scraps? With just a bowl full of water, a leftover stalk, and a few days to spare, you can easily regrow this plant from leavings that you might have thrown away otherwise. Read more to learn a quick and easy technique for growing bok choy from a stalk.

What Causes Turnips to Crack or Rot?

A close up horizontal image of gloved hands pulling a fresh turnip root out of the ground. In the background are other mature plants pictured in soft focus.

You fertilized, watered, and fussed over your turnips for weeks, and it’s time to pull them from the ground. But instead of perfectly-shaped roots, you find cracked, split, or rotten ones instead. What went wrong? What could you have done differently? Read on to learn what causes these issues and how to prevent them.

Health Benefits of Turnip Greens

A close up horizontal image of freshly harvested turnip greens set on a wooden surface.

Turn up your diet quality with turnip greens! This leafy vegetable packs in a powerful nutritional punch. Turnips are best known for their roots, but don’t forget to keep the tops too! Adding the homegrown greens to salads or sauteing them with aromatics offers many robust health benefits. Read on to learn more.

Identifying and Controlling Cabbage Maggots

A close up of a cabbage maggot (Delia radicum) burrowing through the root of a cruciferous vegetable.

Cabbage maggots are tiny insects in the soil, and often by the time the plants show symptoms, it is too late to save them. Knowing what to look for lets you monitor for them and identify their presence in time to implement control measures. Read on to learn how to identify and control these pernicious pests.

What Is the Difference Between Broccoli Rabe and Broccolini?

A close up of a floret and the foliage of broccoli rabe growing in the garden in light sunshine.

Is there a difference between broccolini and broccoli rabe? Or are they the same? These two veggies look a lot alike and have similar names. But they are different – in their origins, how they grow in the garden, and how you’ll want to use them in the kitchen! To learn what distinguishes these two veggies, keep reading.

How to Grow Bok Choy

A close up of bok choy plants in the garden, their dark green leaves contrasting with the lighter veins and stems, in bright sunshine. The background is rich soil surrounding the plants.

Why not add this easy to grow, delicious vegetable to your cool-weather garden this season? Popular in stir-fries, with delicate leaves and crisp white stems, bok choy is a versatile ingredient in the kitchen – and packs quite the nutritional punch. Learn how to plant and grow bok choy in your garden. Read more now.

How to Harvest Turnips

A close up of a bunch of freshly harvested turnips on soil in the sunshine. The roots are round and bulbous and the green stems and foliage are still attached.

Think it might be time to harvest your turnip crop, but you’re not quite sure of how to proceed? Luckily, harvesting turnips is easy with a little gardening know-how. Read more now to learn how and when to harvest homegrown turnip roots and greens, plus the best storage practices and some bonus recipe ideas.

How to Control Turnip Mosaic Virus

Close up of cabbage leaves infected with the Turnip Mosaic Virus.

Turnip mosaic virus affects cabbage and a broad range of cole crops along with many other types of plants. Weeds serve as reservoirs for the disease, which is spread by aphids. Read on to learn how to control this potentially devastating disease.

How to Control White Leaf Spots on Cruciferous Vegetables

Top down view of a turnip leaf infected with white leaf spot (Cercospora brassicicola).

White spot fungi are selective in the crucifers they infect and cause disease on the leaves of turnip, rutabaga, canola, mustard, radish, and horseradish. The fungi overwinter on volunteer plants and cruciferous weeds. Read on to learn how to control white spot fungus on crucifers.

How to Plant and Grow Turnips

Looking for a versatile, nutritious, and easy to grow cole crop to plant in your garden this season? There is a reason that the turnip has been a staple of the human diet for centuries! Learn more about how to grow and care for this historic crop right here on Gardener’s Path.

How to Eradicate Cabbage Worms on Cole Crops and Crucifers

Macro shot of the imported cabbage worm on a green leaf of a cole crop plant

Cabbage butterflies live throughout the US and southern Canada. While you can handpick the cabbage worms if there are just a few, large numbers can kill your cabbage plants and many other cole crops and crucifers. Read on to learn how to control these voracious caterpillars.

What’s Eating My Turnips? How to Eradicate Turnip and Rutabaga Pests

Turnip and rutabaga plants can be severely infested by several types of insects. While row covers can prevent some of these infestations, wireworms are soil-borne threats that can cause the end of the season’s crop in an infested field. Read on to learn how to manage cabbage aphids, root maggots, flea beetles, sawflies, and more.

How to Stop Turnips from Bolting and Going to Seed

Close up of a turnip forming a flower head to produce seed.

Can’t understand why your turnip crop keeps bolting? Bolting is caused by stress on plants and can be easily addressed with a few simple tricks. Learn what factors can cause bolting in turnips and explore some ways that you can prevent your turnip crop from bolting. Read more now.

How to Identify and Treat Diseases of Turnips and Rutabagas

Close up of a turnip plant with diseased leaves.

Fungi, bacteria, and water molds cause multiple types of diseases on the leaves or roots of turnips and rutabagas. In addition, turnip mosaic virus is a debilitating disease. You can prevent many diseases by using clean or heat-treated seeds. Read on to find out what symptoms to look for on your crops.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Bacterial Leaf Spot on Turnip Crops

Close up of a turnip leaf showing bacterial leaf infection.

Bacterial leaf spot on turnip can be caused by two different types of bacteria. This disease spreads easily and can be very difficult to control. Preventing the pathogens from becoming established is the best way to protect your turnip crop. Read on to learn how to protect your plants from these bacteria.

How to Identify and Treat Turnips With Downy Mildew

Downy mildew (Peronospora parasitica) infection on a turnip leaf underside. Black background.

Cool, wet conditions favor downy mildew infection on turnips. Not only can the pathogen destroy the leaves, but it can also spread into the root and cause the turnips to crack. Fall crops are particularly susceptible to this fungus-like organism. Read on to learn how to prevent and control this disease.

How to Identify and Treat Alternaria Leaf Spot on Turnips

Close up of half a tunip leaf infected with Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria brassicicola or brassicae).

Species of the fungus Alternaria can infect your turnips, causing leaf spots and spreading to the seed pods. There are a number of methods to prevent this disease, and both microbial and synthetic fungicides that will control it. To learn how to prevent and control this disease, read more now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Identify and Control Turnip Black Rot

Close up of a turnip leave showing splotchy areas indicative ofbBlack rot (Xanthomonas campestris)

Black rot of turnips caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is a devastating bacterial disease that is easily spread. Since it is very difficult to control, preventing it from becoming established is your best bet. Read on to learn how to keep your turnips from becoming infected with black rot.

How to Identify and Prevent White Rust on Turnip

White rust (Albugo candida) on Turnips. Close up.

White rust infects cruciferous plants, including turnips, around the world. It produces white pustules on the leaves and can distort the flower heads. However, this organism does not kill the plants. Read on to learn how to prevent white rust using cultural control methods.