How to Treat Powdery Mildew Using Homemade and Organic Remedies

A close up horizontal image of a cucurbit leaf suffering from an infection of powdery mildew, a fungal infection that can be treated with a homemade or organic remedy.

Powdery mildew is a chronic problem in temperate climates throughout the world. Fortunately, it does not usually kill its hosts, but it can debilitate them. You can treat this fungal infection with a range of certified organic products and homemade treatments. Read more now to learn how to use these remedies in your garden.

How to Identify and Treat Common Viburnum Diseases

A horizontal image of a large flowering viburnum shrub growing in the garden with trees in soft focus in the background.

Viburnums are versatile, low-maintenance shrubs that are usually disease-free, but under certain conditions, you may face issues. Many of these are fungal in nature, causing damage that is merely cosmetic, though others may be more serious. Learn how to identify and treat common viburnum diseases in this guide. Read more.

Insects Chewed Holes in my Homegrown Greens! Are They Safe to Eat?

A close up horizontal image of green lettuce growing in the garden with insect holes in the leaves.

Are leafy greens with bug holes okay to eat? They might be, but this is not the case if mammals have been nibbling on your crop. Shockingly, eating a raw slug or snail can also impact your health in rare cases. Read more now to learn when it is okay to eat greens from the garden that have been damaged by insects.

Crown Rot Identification and Tips for Treatment

A close up horizontal image of the base of a tree suffering from crown rot.

Crown rot can appear out of nowhere and cause your plants to collapse, or even die. While the symptoms are usually similar, various pathogens can cause this ailment. Identifying the specific pathogen involved can help you to treat or prevent crown rot disease. Learn how to tell these pathogens apart in this guide.

How to Prevent Soggy Breakdown Disorder in Apples

Oblique view of Honeycrisp apples that have been sliced open to show soggy breakdown disorder.

Soggy breakdown disorder is a particular problem in Honeycrisp apples, and the fruit can be hiding this issue even though it looks fine on the outside. Read more now to learn how to prevent soggy breakdown in your homegrown harvest by conditioning the fruit before storing it at the proper temperature.

Why Are the Stems on My Dracaena Turning Black?

A close up horizontal image of a Dracaena marginata plant pictured from below, growing in a pot indoors.

Despite the hardiness of most Dracaena plants, these houseplants are susceptible to infections that cause their stems to turn black. This is usually due to fungal root rots that occur from overwatering. Read more now to learn how to diagnose black stems on Dracaena and what to do with an infected plant.

How to Identify and Control Squash Bugs

A close up horizontal image of a squash bug (Anasa tristis) on the edge of a leaf pictured on a soft focus background.

Are you struggling to combat a squash bug infestation in the garden? Anasa tristis is a pesky insect that resembles a stink bug in its adult stage, and these pests can cause damage and wilting in your squash plants and other edibles. In this guide we offer tips that can help to save your cucurbit harvest. Read more now.

How to Identify and Control Peach Twig Borers

A close up horizontal image image of an orchard growing a variety of fruits on a cloudy sky background.

Peach twig borers (Anarsia lineatella) start by infesting the shoots of stone fruit and almond trees, moving on to the fruit once it matures. These insects can cause serious losses, and aggressive control measures may be necessary to eradicate them. Read on to learn how to identify and control this pernicious garden pest.

How to Fix Wilting Pumpkin Plants: 11 Common Culprits

A close up horizontal image of wilting pumpkin foliage in the vegetable garden pictured in bright sunshine.

Many common factors can cause pumpkin plants to wilt, ranging from soil that is too dry or wet to a number of potentially devastating disease pathogens and insects. Purging infected plants from your garden and controlling pests can help to save your pumpkins. Read more now to learn how to troubleshoot in your garden.

How to Diagnose and Prevent Phony Peach Disease

Close up of small peaches infected with Xylella fastidiosa that cause phony peach disease.

Every type of peach (as well as almond and apricot) is susceptible to phony peach disease, which results in compact bushy trees that stop producing fruit. There is no cure, and you will have to destroy your tree if it’s infected. Read more now to find out how you can prevent this insidious disease from affecting your home orchard.

How to Identify and Prevent Late Blight of Tomatoes

A close up horizontal image of a tomato plant suffering from a bad case of late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans, a nefarious water mold.

Late blight can rapidly devastate entire tomato crops under favorable conditions. Experts advise checking plants at least twice a week to monitor for this infection, and you can consult local resources to find out if it is active in your area. Read more to learn what to look for and how to prevent late blight.

25 of the Best Bergenia Cultivars for the Garden

A close up horizontal image of light pink bergenia flowers growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background.

Bergenia is a low maintenance evergreen perennial with large foliage that changes to bronze or red in the winter, and delicate pink, purple, or white flowers. There are numerous award-winning cultivars available to the home gardener. Learn about 25 of the best bergenia varieties and choose your favorites. Read more now.

How to Identify and Control Common Bergenia Pests

A close up horizontal image of the bright pink flowers of a bergenia plant growing in the garden pictured in bright sunshine.

Although bergenia is a low maintenance plant that is rarely bothered by pests, there are exceptions. Black vine weevils can chew notches on the leaves and damage the roots. Slugs can be a problem in plants that have decaying leaves on them. Read on to learn how to control these pests on your bergenia plants.

How to Recognize Common Disease Symptoms in Bergenia

A close up horizontal image of a bergenia plant growing in the garden with some spots on the foliage.

Although bergenia typically resists disease, specialized fungi can attack these plants. The most common disease is anthracnose, which can cause spots on the leaves and stems, and more rarely, crown or rhizome rot. Fortunately leaf spots are treatable. Read on to learn how to recognize and control diseases in bergenia.

How to Grow and Care for Bergenia Flowers

A close up horizontal image of bright pink bergenia flowers growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background.

Bergenia is a perennial that can serve as a highly attractive ground cover or be grown as part of a mixed border. The large leaves typically turn bronze or purple in the fall, and stunning pink, white, purple, or red flowers appear in spring. Learn how to plant and grow easy-care bergenia in your garden. Read more now.

How to Use Beneficial Nematodes to Reduce Pests in Your Garden

Top down view of various beneficial nematodes view through a microscope.

Beneficial nematodes may be used to control soilborne insects in their larval and nymph stages. These tiny, worm-like organisms penetrate the body of their host, introducing a strain of bacteria that kills the host insect. Learn how to use beneficial nematodes for garden pest control in this guide. Read more now.

How to Identify and Control Common Asparagus Diseases

A close up horizontal image of asparagus spears emerging from the ground pictured in bright sunshine.

Many types of fungi, a water mold, and several viruses can infect asparagus plants, with varying degrees of severity. This guide will help you to diagnose what is ailing your crop and provide tips on what to do about it. Read on to learn about the dizzying array of pathogens that can infect asparagus.

How to Identify, Treat, and Prevent Common Apple Diseases

A close up horizontal image of apples growing in the garden suffering from disease pictured on a soft focus background.

Growers typically plant resistant apple varieties to control the major pathogens in their region. What can home gardeners do to prevent the occurrence of diseases on their apple trees? Read more to discover prevention techniques, learn ways to identify common diseases of apples, and implement control methods.

How to Identify and Control Septoria Leaf Spot on Tomatoes

A close up horizontal image of a hand from the bottom of the frame holding the foliage of a tomato plant suffering from Septoria leaf spot, a fungal disease.

If you live in a climate that tends to be hot and humid, Septoria leaf spot can be a devastating disease of tomatoes. This fungal infection can be very persistent, so you may need to use fungicides to keep it under control. Read on to learn how to prevent, identify, and control this disease in the garden.

What Is Purple Spot of Asparagus?

A horizontal image of an asparagus field with rows of ferns.

The fungal disease purple spot produces purple lesions on asparagus spears as they emerge from the ground. It spreads from infected asparagus residue that remains in your garden. This disease can be severe in wet weather and shorten the lifespan of your plants. Read on to learn how to manage this disease.

How to Identify and Treat Asparagus Crown and Root Rot

A close up horizontal image of an asparagus plant suffering from crown and root rot growing in the garden pictured in light sunshine.

The organisms that cause crown and root rot can live in the soil for very long periods. There are no good chemical controls for Fusarium, but there are some for Phytophthora. You can minimize the stress to your asparagus to prevent these diseases and make them more likely to survive. Read on to learn these steps.

What Is Asparagus Rust?

A closeup horizontal image of an asparagus plant suffering from rust, a fungal disease, pictured on a soft focus background.

Asparagus rust is a highly complicated fungal disease with four different stages that can invade your plants without showing symptoms until it is too late. Cultivars bred to be resistant to this pathogen often lose effectiveness over time. Read on to learn what symptoms to look for and how to treat your infected plants.

Is Dracaena Toxic to Cats or Dogs?

A close up horizontal image of a small moggie sitting behind a houseplant pictured on a soft focus background.

Can ingesting dracaena be harmful to cats and dogs? You will need to monitor for adverse symptoms and call the vet if your pet samples this type of houseplant, a common pick among indoor gardeners. Read on to learn more about the toxicity of dracaena to household pets, symptoms to watch out for, and care tips.

How to Identify and Control Hellebore Pests

A close up horizontal image of two peach colored hellebore flowers growing in the garden pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

Hellebores provide color in the late winter to early spring garden with their delightful cup-shaped flowers. While they are typically trouble-free, these robust plants can occasionally suffer from infestations. Learn how to identify and control the most common hellebore pests in this guide. Read more now.

How to Identify and Control Allium Leaf Miners

A close up horizontal image of Phytomyza gymnostoma fly on green foliage pictured on a soft focus background.

Allium leaf miners are devastating pests of garlic, onions, shallots, chives, and leeks – and can destroy an entire crop. These invasive pests are spreading rapidly throughout the mid-Atlantic and northeastern regions of the US. Learn how to identify, prevent, and control allium leaf miners in this guide. Read more now.

How to Identify and Treat Hellebore Diseases

A close up horizontal image of a clump of early-spring flowering hellebores in pink and cream pictured on a soft focus background.

Hellebores provide color in the late winter to early spring landscape and are typically trouble-free. However, there are some diseases that may infect your plants, caused by fungi, water molds, and a particularly virulent virus. Learn how to identify and treat common hellebore diseases in this guide. Read more now.

How to Identify and Treat Agapanthus Diseases

A close up horizontal image of bright blue agapanthus flowers growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background.

Agapanthus are easygoing, robust plants that don’t typically succumb to disease. However, in some cases they may become infected by fungi and water molds, generally as a result of poor growing conditions. Learn how to diagnose and treat the most common agapanthus diseases in this guide. Read more now.

How to Control Root-Knot Nematodes in Your Garden

A human hand holding a plant pulled from the garden and showing roots with signs of nematode infection.

Root-knot nematodes are a threat to plants and crops worldwide. Infestations can be difficult to diagnose and control, but you can prevent the spread of the nematodes by implementing a number of cultural and organic measures. Learn how to identify, manage, and prevent a root-knot nematode infestation. Read more now.

What Is Hellebore Black Death?

A horizontal image of a large swath of hellebore flowers blooming in the late winter garden.

If you’re growing hellebores and they are showing signs of disease, you’ll need to rule out hellebore black death. This incurable viral infection is characterized by black streaks on the leaves, stems, and flower bracts. Learn more about this devastating disease and how to identify it in this guide. Read more now.

Tips to Identify and Prevent Peace Lily Diseases

A close up horizontal image of a Spathiphyllum plant with green foliage and long white flowers with a brick wall in the background.

Peace lilies are typically easygoing houseplants, but occasionally they may come down with a disease. Most common peace lily diseases occur in nurseries, but certain root rots can strike houseplants in loving homes. Learn more about how to protect your peace lilies from disease now in this guide. Read more now.

3 Tips to Prevent Amaryllis Bulb Rot

A close up horizontal image of a bright red Hippeastrum flower pictured on a soft focus background.

Amaryllis bulbs can rot for a variety of reasons, like fungal infections or insect infestation, but some can be avoided. Are you doing everything you can to ensure beautiful blooms, and growing your decorative holiday plants in the best possible conditions? Read our top tips now to ensure healthy bulbs, indoors or out.

How to Spot Southern Blight Disease in Amaryllis Plants

A close up horizontal image of a Hippeastrum flower growing outdoors that is afflicted with a disease pictured on a soft focus background.

Whether grown in a pot or in your garden, amaryllis bulbs can be attacked by the pernicious disease known as southern blight. This fungus is extremely difficult to control, so preventing it is of the utmost importance. Read on to learn how to diagnose southern blight and prevent it from attacking your plants.

Are Peace Lilies Toxic to Cats?

A close up horizontal image of a large gray cat sniffing the leaf of a peace lily plant growing in an orange container, pictured in bright sunshine.

Cats that have eaten peace lilies may show symptoms ranging from sudden yowling to an upset stomach. If your cat is pawing at its face after eating your houseplant, it’s important to know what to do! While less harmful than true lilies, the toxicity of this plant is not to be taken lightly. Read on to learn more.

How to Prevent and Treat Powdery Mildew on Pumpkin Plants

A close up horizontal image of a large green leaf covered in a white fungal coating with small developing fruit in the background pictured on a soft focus background.

Pumpkin plants are highly susceptible to powdery mildew, a fungal infection can affect the quality of the fruit. In severe cases, it can destroy your whole crop. However, there are treatments available and preventative measures you can take. Learn how to prevent and treat powdery mildew on your pumpkins in this guide.

How to Grow Bird of Paradise: a Stunning Easy-Care Perennial

A close up horizontal image of a Strelitzia reginae flower growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background.

The iconic flowers of the bird of paradise plant have made it a popular landscape plant in regions with warm climates. And despite their regal appearance, these plants are relatively easy to care for, and rarely succumb to pests or diseases. Read on to learn how to grow birds of paradise in your garden in Zones 9-12.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Sooty Mold

Dark sooty mold covers a plant leaf.

Sooty mold is an unsightly condition that occurs when sap-sucking insects leave behind a sugary substance on the leaves or stems of your plants and dark-colored fungi colonize the area to feed on the sugars. The is often merely cosmetic but severe cases can damage or kill your plants. Learn more about sooty mold now.

How To Identify, Prevent, and Treat Common Tomato Diseases

A horizontal image of tomato plants suffering from disease and starting to die off, pictured in bright sunshine fading to soft focus in the background.

Not sure what’s plaguing your tomatoes? Our roundup of common tomato plant diseases can help you to identify, treat, and prevent a variety of fungal, bacterial, and viral ailments, as well as other issues that may arise. From Alternaria stem canker to Verticillium wilt, we’ve got you covered. Read more now.

Identify, Prevent, and Treat Common Cabbage Diseases

A close up horizontal image of a cabbage growing in the garden suffering from a disease, pictured in light sunshine.

Do your cabbage plants appear diseased? An array of organisms can afflict cabbage plants, ranging in severity from powdery mildew, which generally does not kill its hosts, to bacterial soft rot, which totally decimates them. Read on to figure out which pathogen has infected your cabbages and what you can do about it.

How to Identify, Control, and Treat Eastern Filbert Blight

A close up of the branches of a hazelnut tree suffering from Eastern filbert blight, showing dark cankers on the stem, pictured in light filtered sunshine.

While the American hazelnuts grown on the East Coast are resistant to Eastern filbert blight, this disease can be devastating to the prized European cultivars commonly grown in Oregon and Washington State. Ready to learn how to identify, prevent, and manage this potentially lethal disease? Read more now.

How to Prevent, Identify, and Treat Blight on Tomatoes

A close up of leaves suffering from a plant disease called blight. The foliage has turned yellow and is wilting, pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

Three types of aggressive microbes can cause tomato blight. Early blight and Septoria blight are fungal diseases, while late blight is caused by a water mold. The symptoms of these diseases all differ slightly, and this guide will show you how to prevent, identify, and treat these insidious infections in your crop.

Tomato Big Bud Disease: Symptoms and Prevention Options

A close up of the distorted flower buds of a tomato plant suffering from a disease spread by leafhoppers, caused by a phytoplasma.

Excessively large green tomato buds that do not develop into flowers can be a sign that your plants are infected with tomato big bud phytoplasma. This disease is incurable, so your main focus should be on prevention. Read on to learn what to look for and how to prevent this disease from infecting your tomato plants.

How to Identify and Prevent Catfacing of Tomatoes

A close up of a ripe red tomato suffering from a condition known as catface that causes scarring and disfigurement.

Catfacing of tomatoes is a physiological disorder that causes deformities in the developing fruit, caused by stressful cultural conditions. Steps you can take to prevent this condition include planting resistant varieties and ensuring your plants are not subjected to cold weather. Read on to learn more about catface.

Identify and Treat Tomatoes with Sclerotinia Stem Rot

A close up of a tomato plant growing in the garden suffering from sclerotinia timber rot.

Sclerotinia stem rot, or white mold of tomato lives up to its name causing brittle dead stalks filled with fluffy white clumps of fungus. This disease frequently kills tomato plants, and the fungi can live in the soil for up to a decade. Read on to learn how to recognize the symptoms and prevent it from spreading.

How to Control Gray Mold (Botrytis Rot) on Strawberries

A close up of strawberries growing in the garden, the one on the left is infected by Botrytis and is covered in a gray mold that is spreading to the ripe fruit beside it.

Gray mold on strawberries is a disease caused by Botrytis that is very common throughout the world, and difficult to control. The fungus is even resistant to most fungicides. Read more now to learn what steps you can take to control this potentially devastating fungus, and prevent it from ruining your harvest.

How to Grow Azure Monkshood for Stunning Fall Color

A close up of the blue flower of Aconitum carmichaelii on a green soft focus background.

An alpine meadow perennial, azure monkshood produces stunning purple-blue flowers and distinctive green foliage in the fall garden. This plant is disease resistant, and relatively easy to care for. Keep it moist, and it should bloom reliably in the fall. Read on to learn how to grow this late season gem now.

How to Identify and Treat Anthracnose on Hydrangeas

A close up of a hydrangea leaf suffering from a fungal infection called anthracnose causing dark brown lesions to appear on the foliage.

Hydrangeas can fall prey to anthracnose, a virulent fungal disease which can cause damage to the leaves, flowers, and even the stems. This fungus spreads quickly in hot, wet weather, but there are steps you can take to limit an infection. Read on to learn how to prevent, diagnose, and manage anthracnose in hydrangeas.

How to Prevent and Treat Early Blight of Tomatoes

A close up of the foliage of a plant suffering from Alternaria solani, causing black spots to develop on the leaves, pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Tomato plants are commonly infected by a fungus that manifests as spots shaped like bull’s-eyes on the leaves and fruit. Your plants are likely to have early blight, caused by the fungus Alternaria. This disease is not usually fatal, but it can ruin your harvest. Read on to learn how to manage this ubiquitous disease.

Juglone in Pecan Leaves Can Harm Plants

A photo of a shady pecan grove showing a sparsely plant populated lane between rows.

As a close relative of black walnut, pecan also produces the strong toxin juglone. This toxin is poisonous to people, animals – and plants. Its presence can make it impossible to grow some kinds of plants under these trees. Read on to learn about juglone in pecan trees and how to work around it.

Are Hellebores Toxic to Animals or People?

Pink-Purple hellebore flowers with vegetation.

Despite their use as a medicine in previous eras, all parts of hellebores are toxic if eaten by children or animals. Key symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, and convulsions in serious cases. Read on to learn what to do if your dogs, cats, or horses ingest hellebore and to learn more about the poisons involved.

How to Prevent and Manage Aster Yellows

Close up of a green deformed coneflower infected by aster yellows.

Aster yellows can infect more than 300 species of plants and produce symptoms such as leaves growing out of flowers and other deformities. Read on to learn how to spot the various symptoms of this disease and manage the aster leafhoppers that transmit it.

How to Rotate Fungicides to Prevent Resistance

A close up of two hands wearing yellow gloves spraying pesticide from a red and black bottle onto the foliage of an infected plant.

Some types of fungi have developed resistance to a number of the fungicides used to control them. However, by knowing how these compounds target the fungi, we can develop a plan to vary treatments and alternate between different types, making resistance much less likely. Read on to learn how to rotate fungicides.

How to Control Raspberry Fruitworms

Raspberry Fruitworms (Butyrus) feeding on berries close up macro shot.

Raspberry fruitworms eat the leaves of raspberries and blackberries, and their larvae infest the fruit. Since this can lead to a very unpleasant surprise for consumers, it is fortunate that there is a range of control options. Gardener’s Path will train you how to monitor your populations of these pests and control them.

Blossom-End Rot: What to Do if Your Tomatoes Rot on the Bottom

A close up of a wicker basket containing a number of green and red tomatoes all suffering from blossom-end rot with dark, rotten areas on the skin of the fruit.

Ripening tomatoes sometimes develop a dark, sunken spot at the blossom end, known as blossom-end rot. But this damage to your crop is not a sign of disease – it’s due to a lack of calcium in the fruit. Read on to learn about the measures you can take to keep your tomatoes safe from this physiological disorder.

Using Pheromones to Control Insects in Your Garden

A close up of a green plastic insect trap hanging from a tree in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Sex appeal comes in all shapes and sizes, but in insects, it’s often rooted in trace amounts of a pheromone. Gardeners and growers use this to their advantage by luring and trapping the males or preventing them from finding their mates. Read on to learn how to use these hormones to control pests in your garden.

How to Prevent and Mitigate Almond Hull Rot

A close up of almonds with the hulls starting to split as they ripen, surrounded by foliage on a soft focus background.

Almond hull rot occurs at hull split and can limit the ability of the trees to bear fruit in the future. And the infected nuts that remain on the tree can harbor navel orange worms. This disease is much worse in well-fertilized and properly irrigated trees. Read on to learn how to prevent and control almond hull rot.

Identifying and Controlling Cabbage Maggots

A close up of a cabbage maggot (Delia radicum) burrowing through the root of a cruciferous vegetable.

Cabbage maggots are tiny insects in the soil, and often by the time the plants show symptoms, it is too late to save them. Knowing what to look for lets you monitor for them and identify their presence in time to implement control measures. Read on to learn how to identify and control these pernicious pests.

How to Prevent Armillaria Root Rot on Apple Trees

A close up of a dead stump with lots of light brown mushrooms growing on and around it with fall leaves and forest in soft focus in the background.

Armillaria root rot is a serious fungal infection that attacks many different plants. This fungus can devastate apples and most other kinds of fruit trees. Resistant to fungicide treatments, it is difficult to control. Learn what makes this pathogen so hard to control and how to prevent infection in your apple trees.

How to Identify and Treat Pecan Twig Dieback Disease

A close up of a healthy pecan tree branch with green leaves, some in shadow, in bright sunshine on a blue sky background.

Stressed pecan trees can be susceptible to pecan twig dieback disease. Caused by fungi, this infection cannot be cured by fungicides. Learn how to identify pecan twig dieback and steps you can take to prevent it from taking hold and how to treat infected trees. Plus tips on how to keep your trees healthy. Read more now.

How to Control Ants in and Around Your Home

A close up of a large number of dark colored ants on a light colored surface.

Are you aggravated by ants crawling around your home? If you have an infestation in your house or yard, it can be very difficult to get it under control. Discover the different methods for controlling ants, including how and when to use bait and what works best for different species. Learn how to eradicate ants now.

How to Identify and Treat Pecan Stem End Blight

A cluster of immature pecan nuts still in green casings growing on the tree surrounded by foliage in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Pecan nuts that start to turn black and fall off the tree may be suffering from stem end blight. This fungal disease is spread by insects feeding on your trees and can cause severe damage to your crop. Fungicide treatment may be necessary if your trees are infected. Learn how to identify and treat this serious disease.

Controlling Thief Ants in Your House and Yard

A group of Solenopsis molesta. The insects are feeding on a greasy substance on a soft focus background.

Thief ants get their name because they steal food and larvae from other ant colonies. These tiny ants have the dubious honor of being among the most difficult types of ants to control in your home – and they can spread human diseases. Learn how to identify, prevent, and manage a thief ant infestation. Read more now.

How to Manage an Argentine Ant Infestation

A close up of an Argentine ant, showing the large bulbous rear with small hairs on a soft focus background.

Argentine ants are one of the most invasive of all ant species. With multiple queens and colonies, they can quickly take over large areas, spreading disease and encouraging crop pests. Learn how to identify these insects and strategies to manage an Argentine ant infestation in your home and garden. Read more now.

9 of the Best Cold Hardy Avocado Trees

A close up of an avocado tree with fruit hanging from the branch, surrounded by leaves with snow and a mountain in the background in bright sunshine.

If you live in a colder climate but still want to grow avocados, you’ll need to choose a cold-hardy variety. Luckily, there are several cultivars available that can tolerate the cold, and still thrive. Discover the best cold tolerant avocado varieties that can withstand freezing temperatures and still produce fruit.

How to Control Pavement Ants

A close up of dark brown pavement ants feeding on a large white piece of bait. The dark background fades to soft focus.

Pavement ants make their nests in concrete slabs under houses or in foundations. You can tell an infestation by the tell-tale piles of soil or sand near the colony. Fortunately, they are fairly easy to control once you know how. Learn how to identify and treat a pavement ant infestation in your home. Read more now.

Tips for Protecting Kale from Pests and Disease

A top down picture of a mature curly kale plant growing in the garden, the large outer leaves are a darker green color and the small inner leaves are reddish green. In bright sunshine, the background is further foliage of the same plant.

Despite kale’s tendency to be healthy and vigorous, the plants can be vulnerable to insects, nematodes, bacteria, and fungi under certain circumstances. Read on to learn how to identify and control pests and pathogens on your kale plants.

How to Manage a Spotted Lanternfly Infestation

A cluster of pinky-gray Lycorma delicatula, spots clearly visible, feast on a tree branch. A couple of leaves to the left of the frame and a soft focus background of leaves and branches.

The invasive spotted lanternfly is currently under quarantine in multiple states, and could easily cause billions of dollars of damage in Pennsylvania alone. It feeds on hardwood and fruit trees and vines, and is a particular threat to grape vines and hops. Read on to learn how to manage an infestation.

How to Control Citronella Ants

Close up of citronella ant clawing on vegetation.

Citronella ants feed on insect secretions rather than human food. So, you might not think they are a threat. However, these ants frequently invade houses when they swarm and look like termites. Read on to discover the difference between citronella ants and termites and what to do when you are under siege.

How to Prevent Rhizopus Rot of Stone Fruits

Close up of three yellow peaches showing signs of rhizopus rot.

Apricot soft rot caused by Rhizopus is a very serious infection that can destroy all your ripe peaches, apricots, nectarines, or plums . However, you can take steps to minimize the chances of your stone fruits from being infected. Read on to learn how to prevent Rhizopus rot in your harvest.

Controlling the Invasive Pharaoh Ant

Macro shot of pharaoh ants collecting food.

Pharaoh ants are highly difficult to control. While they are extensive problems in Florida and Texas, they also infest buildings in cooler climates. These aggressive ants will even attack the skin of burn victims in hospitals. Read on for tips on controlling these foreign invaders.

How to Protect Your Produce Against Bacterial Soft Rot

A farmer holds up a freshly dug potato showing an oozy bacterial soft rot mess on the inside of the tuber.

While you may think of potatoes when you think of soft rot, these bacterial diseases destroy a range of plants – from broccoli to tomatoes. There is no cure once your produce is infected, but there are steps you can take to prevent infection. Read on to learn how to protect your stored crops against bacterial soft rot.

How to Control Turnip Mosaic Virus

Close up of cabbage leaves infected with the Turnip Mosaic Virus.

Turnip mosaic virus affects cabbage and a broad range of cole crops along with many other types of plants. Weeds serve as reservoirs for the disease, which is spread by aphids. Read on to learn how to control this potentially devastating disease.

How to Manage Root Rot in Fruit, Nut, and Landscape Trees and Shrubs

Tree roots infected with root rot.

Phytophthora and the fungi Armillaria, Phymatotrichum, and Xylaria can all cause devastating cases of root rot on fruit, nut, and landscape trees along with woody shrubs. Prevention is the best way to manage these diseases. Read on to learn the best ways to avoid these diseases and biocontrol agents and fungicides that may help with Phytophthora root rot.

How to Control Odorous House Ants

Odorous house ant on a leaf.

Odorous house ants are native to the entire continental United States and are one of the most common types of ants that infest houses. They prefer warm, moist places like hot water heaters and will even nest behind paneling. Read on to learn how to eradicate these invasive creatures.

How to Prevent Pierce’s Disease on Grapevines

Close up of a grape leaf with brown splotches caused by

An incurable grapevine disease that is spread by very common insects threatens grapevines in warmer parts of the United States. However, there are steps you can take to prevent your plants from becoming infected by both tackling the insects that spread it and implementing cultural methods to protect your plants. Read on to learn how to prevent Pierce’s disease.

How to Keep Slugs Off Cabbage and Other Cole Crops

A slug eating a cabbage leaf. Close up photo.

Although slugs can be highly serious pests of cabbage and other cruciferous veggies, there are a variety of techniques that you can use to control these land mollusks. Read on to learn a number of ways to banish slugs from your garden. You have options ranging from barriers to traps to predatory slugs and bait.

How to Control White Leaf Spots on Cruciferous Vegetables

Top down view of a turnip leaf infected with white leaf spot (Cercospora brassicicola).

White spot fungi are selective in the crucifers they infect and cause disease on the leaves of turnip, rutabaga, canola, mustard, radish, and horseradish. The fungi overwinter on volunteer plants and cruciferous weeds. Read on to learn how to control white spot fungus on crucifers.

How to Eradicate Cabbage Worms on Cole Crops and Crucifers

Macro shot of the imported cabbage worm on a green leaf of a cole crop plant

Cabbage butterflies live throughout the US and southern Canada. While you can handpick the cabbage worms if there are just a few, large numbers can kill your cabbage plants and many other cole crops and crucifers. Read on to learn how to control these voracious caterpillars.

What’s Eating My Turnips? How to Eradicate Turnip and Rutabaga Pests

Turnip and rutabaga plants can be severely infested by several types of insects. While row covers can prevent some of these infestations, wireworms are soil-borne threats that can cause the end of the season’s crop in an infested field. Read on to learn how to manage cabbage aphids, root maggots, flea beetles, sawflies, and more.

What Causes Yellowing and Thinning of Kale Leaves?

Close up of kale leaves turning yellow while growing in a veggie garden.

Although kale plants are usually healthy, yellowing and thinning leaves can be signs of potentially fatal bacterial infections. These diseases rapidly spread to nearby plants and can destroy whole fields. Read on to learn how to prevent leaf spot bacteria and black rot from infecting your plants.

Using Organic Methods to Control the Spotted Wing Drosophila

Close up of two spotted wing Drosophila flies on a strawberry.

From its initial discovery in California in 2009, the spotted wing Drosophila spread throughout the US wreaking havoc on raspberries, blueberries, and many other types of fruits. This fly is very difficult to control, but you can do so organically. Read on to learn how to control this pest in your home garden.

How to Identify and Treat Diseases of Turnips and Rutabagas

Close up of a turnip plant with diseased leaves.

Fungi, bacteria, and water molds cause multiple types of diseases on the leaves or roots of turnips and rutabagas. In addition, turnip mosaic virus is a debilitating disease. You can prevent many diseases by using clean or heat-treated seeds. Read on to find out what symptoms to look for on your crops.

How to Identify and Treat Hydrangea Diseases

Close up of splotchy leaves of a hydrangea bush with a fungal disease.

Numerous fungi and viruses can infect hydrangea shrubs. In addition, two types of bacteria can also cause important diseases. You can treat most of these diseases and save your plants. Read on to learn how to diagnose and treat diseases on hydrangea.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Bacterial Leaf Spot on Turnip Crops

Close up of a turnip leaf showing bacterial leaf infection.

Bacterial leaf spot on turnip can be caused by two different types of bacteria. This disease spreads easily and can be very difficult to control. Preventing the pathogens from becoming established is the best way to protect your turnip crop. Read on to learn how to protect your plants from these bacteria.

How to Identify and Prevent Apple Cork Spot

An apple hanging from a tree with signs of cork spot.

If your apples have green dimples on them, they do not have a fungal disorder. Your fruit lack calcium and have apple cork spot. You can prevent this from happening in the future by liming your soil or spraying your trees with calcium. Read on to find out how to diagnose and prevent this physiological disorder.

How to use Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to Control Insect Pests

A pump sprayer is being used in a backyard setting to apply Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to control insect pests.

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a microbial insecticide that is highly specific for certain kinds of insects and safe against people and non-target animals. Certain strains control caterpillars, mosquitoes, black flies, and a few kinds of beetles. Read on to learn how to use this novel but natural insecticide.

How to Identify and Treat Turnips With Downy Mildew

Downy mildew (Peronospora parasitica) infection on a turnip leaf underside. Black background.

Cool, wet conditions favor downy mildew infection on turnips. Not only can the pathogen destroy the leaves, but it can also spread into the root and cause the turnips to crack. Fall crops are particularly susceptible to this fungus-like organism. Read on to learn how to prevent and control this disease.

Controlling Plant Pathogens With the Biofungicide Bacillus subtilis

Close up of a graphic in green showing a microscopic view of the biofungicide bacillus subtilis.

Bacillus subtilis can control a range of fungal and bacterial pathogens in the soil and on leaves. It directly inhibits other microbes and also stimulates the plants to control pathogens using their own natural resistance mechanisms. Read on to learn more about these versatile bacteria.

How to Identify and Treat Alternaria Leaf Spot on Turnips

Close up of half a tunip leaf infected with Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria brassicicola or brassicae).

Species of the fungus Alternaria can infect your turnips, causing leaf spots and spreading to the seed pods. There are a number of methods to prevent this disease, and both microbial and synthetic fungicides that will control it. To learn how to prevent and control this disease, read more now on Gardener’s Path.

Yellowjacket Identification, Facts, and Control Measures

Macro shot of a yellowjacket wasp looking at the camera.

Although yellowjackets consume a large volume of agricultural pests, they are very aggressive when protecting their nests and cause most of the stinging deaths in the US. Read on to learn how to manage these inhospitable guests on your property.

How to Identify and Control Turnip Black Rot

Close up of a turnip leave showing splotchy areas indicative ofbBlack rot (Xanthomonas campestris)

Black rot of turnips caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is a devastating bacterial disease that is easily spread. Since it is very difficult to control, preventing it from becoming established is your best bet. Read on to learn how to keep your turnips from becoming infected with black rot.

How to Identify and Control Cotton Root Rot in Fruit and Nut Trees

Dead fruit trees killed from cotton root rot (Phymatotrichum omnivorum) in an orchard setting.

Cotton root rot infects more than 2,300 plant species in the southwest, including apples, peaches, almonds, and most other fruit and nut trees. While the disease is usually fatal, there are some steps you can take that might save your tree. Read on at Gardener’s Paths to find what to do if your tree has this disease.

Trichoderma Improves Plant Growth and Kills Fungal Pathogens

A micro view showing light green Trichoderma Fungi.

Trichoderma harzianum T-22 is a highly developed fungal strain that effectively controls a number of fungal pathogens of plants. This fungus colonizes plant roots and does not affect other beneficial microbes like mycorrhizae or Rhizobium. Read on to learn more about this fascinating organism now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Use Streptomyces lydicus to Control Fungal Plant Diseases

A microscopic vie of the Streptomyces bacteria.

The bacteria Streptomyces lydicus colonize plant roots and protect them against fungi and bacteria that cause disease. They can also be sprayed on plant leaves to control foliar pathogens. These bacteria are safe for people and beneficial insects. Read on to learn how they work and how to use them in your garden.

How to Identify and Prevent White Rust on Turnip

White rust (Albugo candida) on Turnips. Close up.

White rust infects cruciferous plants, including turnips, around the world. It produces white pustules on the leaves and can distort the flower heads. However, this organism does not kill the plants. Read on to learn how to prevent white rust using cultural control methods.

What’s the Difference Between Tree Burr Knots (Burl) and Crown Galls?

Close up of an old tree limb with burrs or burl growth.

Do your shade, nut, or fruit tree limbs and trunks have unsightly growths on them? If so, they are probably burr knots or crown gall. One is due to roots growing on the stems, while the other is a bacterial infection. Prevention is the best bet for these disorders. Learn how to prevent and, in some cases, control them.

How to Identify and Control Walnut Husk Flies

Side profile of the walnut husk fly (Rhagoletis completa) on a gray background.

Walnut husk flies are damaging pests, particularly in California and Washington State. The flies pupate in the ground for 1-2 years and spend their larval stage hidden inside the husks. However, by monitoring the adults, you will know when to treat these pests before they lay their eggs. Read on to learn how to control these voracious insects.

How to Identify and Prevent Southern Blight on Apple Trees

Since southern blight can infect hundreds of plants and live in the soil for years, it is a severe threat to apple and crabapple trees. Especially if you live in the south, learn how to prevent this disease and keep it at bay with rigorous sanitation.

How to Identify and Control Apple Black Rot and Frogeye Leaf Spot

An apple leaf with frogeye leaf spots. Close up.

The complex of apple black rot cankers, black rot on fruit, and frogeye leaf spot can cause serious losses on apples and crabapples. However, you can minimize the damage by removing dead tissue and mummified fruit. Read on to learn the details of controlling these diseases.