How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Common Beet Diseases

A close up horizontal image of a beet plant growing in the garden suffering from an unidentified disease on the foliage, pictured in bright sunshine.

Dealing with beet diseases is frustrating, and some of them can destroy your harvest. From bacteria to viruses, there are lots of potential pathogens you may face. With the right knowledge, you can tackle most problems before they get out of hand. Read more now to learn how to identify and tackle your garden woes.

13 Common Beet Pests: Identification, Control Tips, and Prevention

A close up horizontal image of a beet plant growing in the garden with leaves wilting in the sun and damage to the roots by soil-borne nematodes.

Beet pests can completely derail your harvest. From maggots that chew up the roots to miners that tunnel through leaves, there are plenty of bugs to watch out for that can quickly destroy a healthy plant. This article will arm you with the knowledge you need to identify and eradicate the most common beet foes.

Identify, Prevent, and Treat Common Cabbage Diseases

A close up horizontal image of a cabbage growing in the garden suffering from a disease, pictured in light sunshine.

Do your cabbage plants appear diseased? An array of organisms can afflict cabbage plants, ranging in severity from powdery mildew, which generally does not kill its hosts, to bacterial soft rot, which totally decimates them. Read on to figure out which pathogen has infected your cabbages and what you can do about it.

How to Identify, Control, and Treat Eastern Filbert Blight

A close up of the branches of a hazelnut tree suffering from Eastern filbert blight, showing dark cankers on the stem, pictured in light filtered sunshine.

While the American hazelnuts grown on the East Coast are resistant to Eastern filbert blight, this disease can be devastating to the prized European cultivars commonly grown in Oregon and Washington State. Ready to learn how to identify, prevent, and manage this potentially lethal disease? Read more now.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Control Common Cauliflower Diseases

A close up horizontal image of two cauliflower plants with small developing heads and soil in soft focus in the background.

Cauliflower is a cool-weather crop that’s challenging to grow. It takes an ideal combination of temperature, moisture, and nutrients for pristine heads to form. Sometimes, even with best practices, plants fall victim to disease. Read on to learn how to avoid, recognize, and address 12 common cauliflower conditions now.

How to Prevent, Identify, and Treat Blight on Tomatoes

A close up of leaves suffering from a plant disease called blight. The foliage has turned yellow and is wilting, pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

Three types of aggressive microbes can cause tomato blight. Early blight and Septoria blight are fungal diseases, while late blight is caused by a water mold. The symptoms of these diseases all differ slightly, and this guide will show you how to prevent, identify, and treat these insidious infections in your crop.

Tomato Big Bud Disease: Symptoms and Prevention Options

A close up of the distorted flower buds of a tomato plant suffering from a disease spread by leafhoppers, caused by a phytoplasma.

Excessively large green tomato buds that do not develop into flowers can be a sign that your plants are infected with tomato big bud phytoplasma. This disease is incurable, so your main focus should be on prevention. Read on to learn what to look for and how to prevent this disease from infecting your tomato plants.

How to Identify and Prevent Catfacing of Tomatoes

A close up of a ripe red tomato suffering from a condition known as catface that causes scarring and disfigurement.

Catfacing of tomatoes is a physiological disorder that causes deformities in the developing fruit, caused by stressful cultural conditions. Steps you can take to prevent this condition include planting resistant varieties and ensuring your plants are not subjected to cold weather. Read on to learn more about catface.

Identify and Treat Tomatoes with Sclerotinia Stem Rot

A close up of a tomato plant growing in the garden suffering from sclerotinia timber rot.

Sclerotinia stem rot, or white mold of tomato lives up to its name causing brittle dead stalks filled with fluffy white clumps of fungus. This disease frequently kills tomato plants, and the fungi can live in the soil for up to a decade. Read on to learn how to recognize the symptoms and prevent it from spreading.

How to Control Gray Mold (Botrytis Rot) on Strawberries

A close up of strawberries growing in the garden, the one on the left is infected by Botrytis and is covered in a gray mold that is spreading to the ripe fruit beside it.

Gray mold on strawberries is a disease caused by Botrytis that is very common throughout the world, and difficult to control. The fungus is even resistant to most fungicides. Read more now to learn what steps you can take to control this potentially devastating fungus, and prevent it from ruining your harvest.

5 Reasons Your Pumpkin Vine Isn’t Blooming

A large pumpkin patch with abundant, large leaves but no flowers.

You’ve nourished and cared for your pumpkin seedlings, and they’ve grown vines and leaves. Flowers should’ve appeared by now, but you don’t see any blooms – and no flowers means no fruit. Did something go wrong? Read more now to learn the top 5 reasons why your pumpkin vine isn’t blooming, and what to do about it.

How to Identify and Treat Anthracnose on Hydrangeas

A close up of a hydrangea leaf suffering from a fungal infection called anthracnose causing dark brown lesions to appear on the foliage.

Hydrangeas can fall prey to anthracnose, a virulent fungal disease which can cause damage to the leaves, flowers, and even the stems. This fungus spreads quickly in hot, wet weather, but there are steps you can take to limit an infection. Read on to learn how to prevent, diagnose, and manage anthracnose in hydrangeas.

How to Identify and Control Common Zucchini Diseases

A close up of a Curcurbita pepo plant suffering from a disease called bacterial wilt, pictured growing in bright sunshine in the garden.

Zucchini is a must-have in any veggie garden because it’s tasty, prolific, and easy to grow. But zucchini can be plagued by some nasty diseases that can reduce your harvest, or even kill your plants entirely. We’ll show you how to deal with diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, and viruses – and how to prevent them in the future.

How to Identify and Control Zucchini Plant Pests

A close up of a large green leaf infested with small black insects, with a garden scene in soft focus in the background.

Have you spotted an insect on your zucchini in the vegetable patch and don’t know what to do about it? Or maybe your plants are failing to thrive and you’re wondering what might be the problem. Learn how to identify and control 9 common zucchini pests. Read more now.

How to Prevent and Treat Early Blight of Tomatoes

A close up of the foliage of a plant suffering from Alternaria solani, causing black spots to develop on the leaves, pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Tomato plants are commonly infected by a fungus that manifests as spots shaped like bull’s-eyes on the leaves and fruit. Your plants are likely to have early blight, caused by the fungus Alternaria. This disease is not usually fatal, but it can ruin your harvest. Read on to learn how to manage this ubiquitous disease.

How to Prevent and Manage Aster Yellows

Close up of a green deformed coneflower infected by aster yellows.

Aster yellows can infect more than 300 species of plants and produce symptoms such as leaves growing out of flowers and other deformities. Read on to learn how to spot the various symptoms of this disease and manage the aster leafhoppers that transmit it.

How to Rotate Fungicides to Prevent Resistance

A close up of two hands wearing yellow gloves spraying pesticide from a red and black bottle onto the foliage of an infected plant.

Some types of fungi have developed resistance to a number of the fungicides used to control them. However, by knowing how these compounds target the fungi, we can develop a plan to vary treatments and alternate between different types, making resistance much less likely. Read on to learn how to rotate fungicides.

How to Control Raspberry Fruitworms

Raspberry Fruitworms (Butyrus) feeding on berries close up macro shot.

Raspberry fruitworms eat the leaves of raspberries and blackberries, and their larvae infest the fruit. Since this can lead to a very unpleasant surprise for consumers, it is fortunate that there is a range of control options. Gardener’s Path will train you how to monitor your populations of these pests and control them.