How to Manage Root Rot in Fruit, Nut, and Landscape Trees and Shrubs

Tree roots infected with root rot.

Phytophthora and the fungi Armillaria, Phymatotrichum, and Xylaria can all cause devastating cases of root rot on fruit, nut, and landscape trees along with woody shrubs. Prevention is the best way to manage these diseases. Read on to learn the best ways to avoid these diseases and biocontrol agents and fungicides that may help with Phytophthora root rot.

How to Identify and Prevent Apple Cork Spot

An apple hanging from a tree with signs of cork spot.

If your apples have green dimples on them, they do not have a fungal disorder. Your fruit lack calcium and have apple cork spot. You can prevent this from happening in the future by liming your soil or spraying your trees with calcium. Read on to find out how to diagnose and prevent this physiological disorder.

How to Identify and Control Cotton Root Rot in Fruit and Nut Trees

Dead fruit trees killed from cotton root rot (Phymatotrichum omnivorum) in an orchard setting.

Cotton root rot infects more than 2,300 plant species in the southwest, including apples, peaches, almonds, and most other fruit and nut trees. While the disease is usually fatal, there are some steps you can take that might save your tree. Read on at Gardener’s Paths to find what to do if your tree has this disease.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Gummosis on Fruit Trees

Close up of gummosis on an apricot tree trunk.

Is your apricot, peach, plum, cherry, or apple tree oozing a lot of gum? If so, it may be infected with the fungus Leucostoma that causes apricot gummosis and cankers. This fungus only infects stressed trees and enters through wounds, so you may be able to avoid it entirely. Read more about how to prevent this disease and ways to treat it.

How to Prevent and Control Powdery Mildew on Apple Trees

An apple tree branch complete coated in a Podosphaera leucotricha fungal infection showing the characteristic white powder-like coating on the leaves.

Do you have a white powdery coating on the leaves of your apple trees? Are trying to figure out what it might be? It’s likely powdery mildew and it needs to be managed. This disease is found in every region of the world that grows apples and damages leaves, limbs, fruit, and may even make an apple harvest impossible. Read on to learn how to recognize this pernicious disease and how to treat it.