35 of the Best Bush Bean Varieties

Once you’ve decided to add bush beans to your garden, there will likely be no going back. These veggies are so easy to grow, such fun to harvest, and so delicious to eat, it’s likely you’ll want to keep adding new types to your summer garden beds each year.

A close up of hands from the right of the frame holding a handful of green bush beans, freshly picked from the plant, in bright sunshine on a soft focus background. To the center and bottom of the frame is green and white text.

But with literally hundreds of varieties out there, it can be hard to know which ones you’ll like best – and which will perform well in your garden.

To help you decide which cultivars you may want to try in your own garden, I’ve compiled a list of 35 of the best bush beans available – including classic snap, stringless, filet, long podded, yellow, purple, and Romano cultivars.

Whether you are new to growing bush beans or are an experienced gardener, there should be something to pique your gardening curiosity on this list.

A close up of a metal bowl with freshly picked bush beans, foliage, and red cherry tomatoes, set on a wooden surface surrounded by herbs on a soft focus background.

There are dry and shelling bush beans too, but for this article, I’ll stick to a selection of the best fresh eating (and freezing and canning) varieties.

And since everyone has different growing conditions, I’ll be sure to mention which ones do well in containers, which are heat resistant, and which can handle cooler climates.

Before I get into the details of what makes each of these bush beans shine, here’s an overview:

Classic Snap Cultivars

Let’s start with the classics. There are a lot of unique selections out there, but sometimes you just want a basic snap bean with that classic green bean taste and texture.

A close up of a wicker basket with green Phaseolus vulgaris pods and bright red cherry tomatoes set on a wooden surface on a dark soft focus background.

Many of these have winning attributes, such as improved disease resistance, making them a breeze to grow.

1. Harvester

‘Harvester’ is a prime example – it’s an open-pollinated heirloom snap with excellent disease resistance.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris growing in the garden in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

This variety produces high yields of 6-inch-long green pods that are smooth, tender, and straight.

Upright plants are 20 inches tall at maturity, and hold their pods high, making picking easy.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Harvester' cultivar set on a wooden surface with foliage scattered around.

‘Harvester’

‘Harvester’ is resistant to mosaic virus and powdery mildew, and is harvest-ready in 55 days.

You can find ‘Harvester’ seeds in packets of various sizes at Eden Brothers.

2. Porch Pick

If you want a classic snap that will behave nicely in a container, ‘Porch Pick’ is the bush bean for you.

A close up of two hands sowing seeds into a small terra cotta pot set on a wooden surface, with grass in soft focus in the background.

This productive variety produces loads of 5-inch-long green pods that are crisp, tender, and flavorful.

Plants are compact with small leaves and grow up to 18 inches tall, making them just right for container gardening.

A close up of a terra cotta pot with a Phaseolus vulgaris 'Porch Pick' plant growing with ready-to-harvest green beans on a soft focus background.

‘Porch Pick’

‘Porch Pick’ will provide you with a generous harvest of bush beans in just 55 days.

You can find packets of 200 seeds available for purchase at Burpee.

3. Prevail

Are you looking for a heat and stress tolerant snap variety that will grow in nearly any climate? ‘Prevail’ will, indeed, prevail.

This open-pollinated variety produces heavy yields in almost any soil type, and is extremely tolerant of hot summer temperatures.

‘Prevail’ sets flavorful, dark green pods that grow to 5 1/2 inches long, ready to harvest in 60 days.

A close up of a wooden bowl containing Phaseolus vulgaris 'Prevail' beans set on a wooden surface with flowers in soft focus in the background.

‘Prevail’

Vigorous plants grow 16-24 inches tall at maturity, and along with being heat tolerant, are also resistant to mosaic virus and curly top virus.

You can find packets of 200 seeds available at Burpee.

4. Tendergreen

If you enjoy using your harvest for canning and freezing, as well as in your home-cooked meals, consider ‘Tendergreen.’

A close up of a Phaseolus vulgaris bush growing in the garden with some insect damage to the foliage, on a soft focus background.

‘Tendergreen’ is an all-purpose snap variety that will please both the gardeners and the cooks in your household.

This reliable heirloom open-pollinated variety produces high yields of tender, green, 6-inch pods that are a delight to the taste buds.

A close up of freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Tendergreen' beans spilling out of a wooden container onto a rustic hessian surface.

‘Tendergreen’

A favorite of many gardeners, ‘Tendergreen’ is sturdy and resistant to mosaic virus, maturing in 60 days.

You’ll find ‘Tendergreen’ seeds for purchase in a variety of packet sizes at Eden Brothers.

Stringless Snaps

Some gardeners may not mind keeping the string in string beans. Stringing beans can bring up fond memories of helping out in the kitchen as a kid.

A close up of a white flower among dark green foliage in light sunshine on a dark soft focus background.

However, for those of us who prefer skipping this additional cooking task, stringless varieties are the clear choice, and there are plenty of stringless options available.

5. Landreth Stringless

‘Landreth Stringless’ is an open-pollinated heirloom variety that was introduced by the Landreth Seed Company in 1885.

It produces fiberless, slightly curved snaps that are medium green in color and hold dark brown seeds.

The 5-inch-long pods are tasty, tender, and meaty – and work wonderfully for canning, or fresh eating.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Landreth Stringless' set on foliage on a wooden surface.

‘Landreth Stringless’

Plants are upright, and produce a good yield of pods in 55 days.

You can find ‘Landreth Stringless’ seeds for purchase in a variety of packet sizes at Eden Brothers.

6. Strike

A heavy yielding, open-pollinated variety, when ‘Strike’ reaches maturity it produces an onrush of pods that are smooth, slim, and straight. And don’t forget – stringless!

A close up of two glass jars containing green bush beans in a dill and garlic pickling mixture.

Pods are medium green in color, 5-6 inches long, and contain white seeds.

These bush beans are great for fresh eating, freezing – and for canning.

Plants are resistant to mosaic virus, and they are large and vigorous, so make sure they have plenty of room to spread.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Strike' set in a wooden container. To the bottom right of the frame is a black circular logo with text.

‘Strike’

‘Strike’ comes to maturity in 54 days.

You can find ‘Strike’ seeds for purchase in a variety of packet sizes at True Leaf Market.

7. Stringless Green Pod

If you like seeds with some history, this heirloom is bound to be of interest. Burpee’s ‘Stringless Green Pod’ is the cultivar that started the stringless green bean trend.

The “father of the stringless bean,” seedsman Calvin N. Keeney, developed this variety, which was introduced through the W. Atlee Burpee Seed Company in 1894.

A close up of fresh green Phaseolus vulgaris with light droplets of water covering their surface.

‘Stringless Green Pod’ is an early maturing, open-pollinated cultivar that produces an abundant yield of dark green pods that are 5-6 inches long in just 50 days.

These slightly curved stringless snaps are flavorful, with a juicy and meaty texture.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Burpee's Stringless Green Pod' growing in the garden, ready for harvest on a dark soft focus background.

‘Stringless Green Pod’

Vigorous plants grow to 12-18 inches tall and are resistant to mosaic virus and powdery mildew. They are also heat tolerant and do well in dry climates.

You can find ‘Stringless Green Pod’ seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Burpee.

8. Tenderette

This heirloom was introduced by the Charter Seed Company of Twin Falls, Idaho in 1962.

Living up to its name, ‘Tenderette’ is an open-pollinated variety that produces an abundance of straight, smooth pods that are tasty and tender.

Stringless dark green pods are 5 inches long and contain white seeds, and they are ready to harvest in 58 days.

A close up of the bright green Phaseolus vulgaris 'Tenderette' beans set on a wooden surface with foliage in the background.

‘Tenderette’

Heat tolerant plants grow to 20 inches in height at maturity, and are resistant to mosaic virus and Northern leaf blight.

You can find ‘Tenderette’ seeds for purchase in several different packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

9. Tenderpod

Another stringless snap named for its succulent texture, ‘Tenderpod’ was the All-America Selections Winner in the edible category in 1941 and is still popular among gardeners.

A close up of a wicker basket set in the garden with a freshly picked green bush beans and brown paper lining. The background is a garden scene in soft focus.

This early maturing, open-pollinated heirloom – also known as ‘Tender Pod’ – produces reliable harvests of 5-inch-long, dark green pods.

Pods are round and thick, slightly curved, and have a tender and crisp texture.

Plants have good general disease resistance and grow to 15-20 inches tall.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Tenderpod' set on a wooden surface.

‘Tenderpod’

‘Tenderpod’ is early maturing, with bush beans ready to harvest in just 50 days.

You can find ‘Tenderpod’ seeds for purchase in 3-ounce packets available at Burpee.

Filet Cultivars

Compared to snap beans, filet beans are slimmer, and are usually prepared whole instead of cutting into pieces.

A close up of a large wicker basket overflowing with green bush beans at a farmer's market with various other vegetables in soft focus in the background.

Also called haricot verts or French filet beans, these tend to be very tender and make excellent side dishes.

10. Beananza

‘Beananza’ was developed by Burpee to be an abundant producer of tender, stringless filet beans. Delectable 7-inch pods are dark green and fiberless.

Small plants reach just 15 inches in height, perfect for container growing – and if picked regularly, they will keep producing for far longer than other cultivars.

A close up of freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Beananza' set on a rustic hessian surface.

‘Beananza’

‘Beananza’ comes to maturity in 55 days.

You can find ‘Beananza’ seeds in a 2-ounce packet size for purchase exclusively at Burpee.

11. Desperado

This heavy yielding cultivar may make you want to hum a classic rock tune while you’re in the garden – but ‘Desperado’ will not leave you feeling desperate for bush beans.

A close up of two hands holding freshly harvested Phaseolus vulgaris on a green soft focus background.

It will keep on giving and giving loads of delicious, dark green filet pods throughout the summer.

These slim haricot verts are 5 1/2 inches long, straight, and have brown seeds.

Upright plants grow 12-15 inches tall, and have a high tolerance to mosaic virus.

A close up of a white ceramic bowl with Phaseolus vulgaris 'Desperado' beans set on a wooden surface.

‘Desperado’

‘Desperado’ is also highly heat tolerant, and will come to maturity in 55 days.

You can find packets containing 200 seeds available at Burpee.

12. Fin de Bagnol

‘Fin de Bagnol’ is a French heirloom that comes with the advantage of performing well in cool soils.

A close up of trimmed and washed thin French filet beans on a wooden surface.

This open-pollinated variety – also known as ‘Fin de Bagnols’ – produces generous yields of tender, thin, filet style bush beans that are typically picked when they are 6-8 inches long.

Pods have an intense flavor. They are green with dark seeds, and stringless if picked young and often.

A close up of a ceramic bowl containing cut up Phaseolus vulgaris 'Fin de Bagnol' beans set on a beige surface.

‘Fin de Bagnol’

Plants grow to 15-20 inches in height, and reach maturity in 55 days.

You can find seeds in 30-gram packets available at Burpee.

13. Masai

‘Masai’ is an heirloom haricot vert that’s perfect for container gardening or small spaces.

A close up of a small white enamel pot containing freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris set on a wooden surface.

This open-pollinated French variety is disease resistant and reliable, producing slender green pods with white seeds.

‘Masai’ provides a harvest of stringless, 4-inch-long “baby” filet bush beans that are tender, tasty, and easy to pick.

Small, compact plants reach 12 inches in height.

Since plants are on the small side, they are not as high yielding as some other varieties, but the tradeoff is that they make excellent potted plants.

Plants are resistant to mosaic virus, bacterial brown spot, and curly top virus.

A close up of the bright green Phaseolus vulgaris 'Masai' beans set on a white surface. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text.

‘Masai’

‘Masai’ matures very early, providing a harvest in just 47 days.

You can find ‘Masai’ seeds for purchase in packets of various sizes at True Leaf Market.

14. Mascotte

If you’re looking for a filet bush bean to grow in containers or small spaces, but want pods a bit larger than the baby filets that ‘Masai’ produces, ‘Mascotte’ is an excellent choice.

A close up of a wicker basket with Phaseolus vulgaris in bright sunshine set on a wooden surface.

In fact, ‘Mascotte’ even won over All-America Selection judges, who awarded it the prize for best new edible variety in 2014.

‘Mascotte’ is open-pollinated, and produces abundant harvests of 6-inch-long filet beans in just 50-55 days.

The green pods from this award winner are stringless, crunchy, and very tasty.

Compact plants grow 16-20 inches tall, and hold pods above their foliage, making picking easy.

Once the plants start producing, harvest every 2-4 days.

A close up of a small terra cotta rectangular container with a Phaseolus vulgaris 'Mascotte' bean plant in flower. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo and text.

‘Mascotte’

If ‘Mascotte’ already sounds too good to be true – wait, there’s more! This variety also has excellent disease resistance, standing up well against anthracnose, mosaic virus, and halo blight.

You can find ‘Mascotte’ seeds for purchase at True Leaf Market, in packs of 1,000 or 10,000 seeds.

15. Triomphe de Farcy

Maybe container gardening isn’t your thing and what you really want is an early maturing filet style bush bean. If so, let me introduce you to ‘Triomphe de Farcy.’

A close up of a small Phaseolus vulgaris plant growing in the garden with light green foliage and soil visible at the bottom of the frame.

This is an open-pollinated French heirloom – sometimes called ‘Triumph de Farcy’ – that matures early and produces an abundant and flavorful crop.

Its pods are green and sometimes streaked with purple. They are slender, crunchy, and stringless when picked young.

Pods should be picked often, when they are 3-6 inches in length, for best texture and flavor.

Plants have general disease resistance and reach 15-20 inches in height.

A close up of the green Phaseolus vulgaris 'Triomphe de Farcy' in a white container.

‘Triomphe de Farcy’

You’ll be harvesting ‘Triomphe de Farcy’ beans in just 48 days.

‘Triomphe de Farcy’ seeds can be purchased in 2-ounce packets at Burpee.

Long Podded Cultivars

To contrast with the somewhat diminutive filet cultivars, I’m now going to explore the opposite end of the bush bean spectrum – varieties with particularly long pods.

A close up of green bush beans washed but not trimmed, set on a wicker surface.

While they may not be as long as Chinese long beans, these long-podded varieties can give you more bean for your buck – and still have that familiar green bean taste.

16. Big Kahuna

‘Big Kahuna’ is a bit of a paradox. It produces the largest pods of the 35 varieties presented here – yet these mammoth bush beans hang from compact plants that easily adapt to containers.

A close up top down picture of a wicker basket containing freshly harvested crops from the garden, green bush beans, yellow zucchini, and ripe red cherry tomatoes set on a grassy surface.

‘Big Kahuna’ produces green snaps that can reach a monster length of 11 inches, while still remaining crisp and tender and keeping their delicious, nutty flavor.

Compact plants grow to 24 inches in height.

A close up of a wooden bowl containing freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Big Kahuna' pods with foliage in the background in soft focus.

‘Big Kahuna’

‘Big Kahuna’ will come to maturity in 57 days after planting.

If you’re ready to catch a wave, dude, you can find ‘Big Kahuna’ seeds in 2-ounce packets, for purchase exclusively at Burpee.

17. Heavyweight II

Brace yourself to be knocked out by this super producer. ‘Heavyweight II’ is an open-pollinated variety that gives an extra heavy yield of long snaps.

The sweet tasting 8-inch pods of ‘Heavyweight II’ are green and tender.

A close up of a wooden container with Phaseolus vulgaris 'Heavyweight II' beans with foliage and a flower at the top right of the frame.

‘Heavyweight II’

Plants are compact, growing to 18 inches tall, and maturing in 53 days.

You can find ‘Heavyweight II’ seeds in 2-ounce packets available exclusively at Burpee.

18. Jade

In addition to its tasty, long pods, ‘Jade’ has so much going for it. This heirloom is open-pollinated and tolerant to stress, heat, and cold. It is also disease resistant and very productive.

A close up of trimmed Phaseolus vulgaris just before cooking, set on a wooden surface in the kitchen.

‘Jade’ produces slender, 7-inch-long, dark green pods that are straight, crisp, and tender – and enclose pale green seeds.

This is a popular variety among gardeners, with an excellent flavor and texture that holds up beautifully to canning.

Although plants are resistant to cool temperatures, like most other beans, they require warm soils for the best rates of germination.

Plants are strong and upright with beans held off the ground, making picking easy.

‘Jade’ is resistant to bean mosaic virus, curly top virus, bacterial brown spot, and rust.

A close up of the fresh green Phaseolus vulgaris 'Jade' beans. To the bottom right of the frame is a black circular logo and text.

‘Jade’

This variety reaches maturity in 57 days.

You can find ‘Jade’ seeds for purchase in package sizes ranging from 30 grams to 50 pounds at True Leaf Market.

19. Kentucky Wonder 125

If ‘Jade’ sounds great but you just can’t wait 57 days, how about an earlier maturing variety for your crop of long-podded snap beans?

A close up of a wicker basket with Phaseolus vulgaris green pods spilling out of it onto the surface below.

‘Kentucky Wonder 125’ is an open-pollinated heirloom that will give you an early and prolific harvest in just 48-50 days.

Pods are 7-8 inches long and flat, with a medium green color and white seeds. These long snaps are tasty and they have a meaty texture.

A close up top down picture of a wicker basket with freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Kentucky Wonder 125' set on the ground, with foliage in the background.

‘Kentucky Wonder 125’

Plants grow to 16 inches tall and are resistant to mosaic virus and Northern leaf blight.

You can find ‘Kentucky Wonder 125’ seeds for purchase in package sizes ranging from 1 ounce to 10 pounds at Eden Brothers.

20. Top Crop

‘Top Crop’ is an early, low maintenance heirloom that won the All-America Selections Gold Medal in the edible category in 1950.

A close up of washed and trimmed green bush beans.

Also known as ‘Topcrop,’ this open-pollinated variety produces heavy yields of 7-inch-long straight pods.

Medium green pods are fiberless with a meaty texture, and very tasty.

‘Top Crop’ is a great all-purpose bush bean, making for delicious fresh eating, but also holding up beautifully to canning and freezing.

Vigorous plants grow to 15-18 inches tall and are resistant to mosaic virus.

A close up of the fresh Phaseolus vulgaris 'Topcrop' set on a wooden surface.

‘Top Crop’

An early maturing bush bean, ‘Top Crop’ will be ready to harvest in just 52 days.

You can find ‘Top Crop’ seeds for purchase in a wide range of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

Yellow Podded Cultivars

We’re now stepping away from green bush beans for a while to consider some yellow podded varieties.

A close up of a Phaseolus vulgaris bush with yellow beans surrounded by foliage pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

Commonly called “wax beans,” the yellow pods of these cultivars are easy to spot on green plants and keep their yellow coloring when cooked.

21. Cherokee Wax

Also known as ‘Cherokee,’ this heirloom open-pollinated variety was an All-America Selections Winner in 1948.

A close up of a wicker basket with yellow bush beans freshly picked from the plant, set on a grass lawn. In the background is a plant in soft focus, pictured in bright sunshine.

It was developed at Clemson University in South Carolina and is well-loved for its productivity and vigor, as well as its delicious, stringless wax beans.

Pods are colored light yellow with black seeds, and reach 5-6 inches in length.

They are tasty, nutty, and tender, retaining their stringless quality even when mature.

‘Cherokee Wax’ makes for excellent fresh eating, but also cans and freezes well.

Plants grow to 24 inches tall and can become somewhat viney, so make sure you give them enough room to sprawl.

A close up top down picture of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Cherokee Wax' pods set on a wooden surface pictured in bright sunshine.

‘Cherokee Wax’

‘Cherokee Wax’ is resistant to mosaic virus and comes to maturity in 58 days.

You can find ‘Cherokee Wax’ seeds for purchase in packet sizes ranging from 1 ounce to 10 pounds at Eden Brothers.

22. Gold Mine

‘Gold Mine’ is an early maturing wax variety that grows in clusters, making picking even easier.

A close up of a metal colander on its side with washed and trimmed yellow bush beans spilling out onto a wooden surface.

This open-pollinated cultivar produces heavy yields of smooth, straight yellow snaps that hold white seeds.

Pods are 5-6 inches long, sweet, crisp, and delicious whether eaten fresh or frozen.

Plants are upright and compact, reaching 15-20 inches in height.

‘Gold Mine’ is resistant to bacterial brown spot, mosaic virus, and halo blight.

A close up of a colander containing Phaseolus vulgaris 'Gold Mine' yellow pods.

‘Gold Mine’

You’ll be ready to harvest your ‘Gold Mine’ crop in 55 days after planting.

You can find ‘Gold Mine’ seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Burpee.

23. Gold Rush Wax

‘Gold Rush Wax’ is an open-pollinated reliable grower whose beans hold well in the garden – and in the fridge.

This cultivar produces high yields of slender, straight pods that mature in 54 days.

Light yellow pods are 5 1/2 inches long, crisp, and tasty.

A close up of freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Gold Rush Wax' in a wicker basket. To the bottom right of the frame is a black circular logo and text.

‘Gold Rush Wax’

Plants grow to 16-20 inches tall and are resistant to mosaic virus, curly top virus, root rot, and bacterial brown spot.

You can find ‘Gold Rush Wax’ seeds for purchase in a variety of packet sizes at True Leaf Market.

24. Golden Wax

‘Golden Wax’ is a productive, stringless wax bush bean that is also early to mature – ready to harvest in just 50 days.

A close up of yellow wax Phaseolus vulgaris beans fading to soft focus in the background.

This open-pollinated variety produces bright yellow snaps that grow to 4-5 inches in length, and have a tasty, buttery flavor.

Plants have an upright habit and reach 16-18 inches tall with a minimal spread, ideal for container gardening.

A close up of freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Golden Wax' set on a wooden surface.

‘Golden Wax’

‘Golden Wax’ is resistant to mosaic virus and rust.

You can find ‘Golden Wax’ seeds in an assortment of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

25. Pencil Pod Wax

Here’s an heirloom that’s been proving itself since 1900. ‘Pencil Pod Wax’ is a heavy producer that’s early maturing and disease resistant.

A close up vertical picture of yellow wax bush beans, Phaseolus vulgaris, set on a wooden surface.

This open-pollinated variety produces abundant harvests of straight pods that reach 5-7 inches in length.

‘Pencil Pod Wax’ is known for its tasty yellow snaps that are stringless and tender. They contain black seeds.

Plants reach 20 inches in height, and are resistant to mosaic virus and powdery mildew.

A close up of the bright yellow Phaseolus vulgaris 'Pencil Pod Wax' vegetables.

‘Pencil Pod Wax’

‘Pencil Pod Wax’ will give you your first of multiple crops in 52 days.

You can find ‘Pencil Pod Wax’ seeds for purchase in a variety of packet sizes at Eden Brothers.

Purple Podded Cultivars

If you like the idea of adding some unexpected color to your garden, purple-podded bush beans are a wonderful addition, both as an edible and an ornamental option. These plants have lovely purple flowers as well.

A close up vertical picture of purple bush beans growing in the garden in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

Just like wax beans, purple podded bush beans stand out from their green foliage, making them easier to see for picking.

And while your harvest will be purple hued, when cooked these beans turn green.

26. Amethyst

‘Amethyst’ is an open-pollinated variety that produces attractive filet style bush beans that are tasty both raw and cooked.

A close up of a terra cotta bowl with purple beans that have been washed but not trimmed set on a dark wooden surface. To the right of the bowl is dark green foliage.

Flavorful purple pods are 5 to 5 1/2 inches long, thin, straight, and stringless, and they hold tan seeds.

Plants are upright, medium sized, and have excellent resistance to mosaic virus.

‘Amethyst’

‘Amethyst’ reaches maturity in 56 days.

You can find ‘Amethyst’ for purchase in packs of 30 seeds from BasqueStore via Amazon.

27. Purple Queen

‘Purple Queen’ has a combination of some of the best characteristics of all the bush beans in this list – it’s stringless, early maturing, productive, and disease resistant.

A close up of a hand from the right of the frame holding a handful of purple bush beans in the bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

Add to that impressive resume the fact that it’s a beautiful deep purple hue, and you may find this royal cultivar irresistible.

‘Purple Queen’ is an open-pollinated heirloom that produces tender, 7-inch-long snaps with a nice beany taste.

Plants grow to 15-20 inches in height, have good general disease resistance, and are tolerant of cooler weather.

A close up of the purple pods of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Purple Queen' set on a white surface.

‘Purple Queen’

‘Purple Queen’ will be ready to harvest in just 52 days after planting.

You can find ‘Purple Queen’ seeds for purchase in 2-ounce packets available at Burpee.

28. Purple Teepee

Despite its name, which might suggest a climber, ‘Purple Teepee’ is a bush variety.

A close up of purple bush beans growing in the garden, surrounded by foliage on a soft focus background.

Open pollinated, it produces straight, slender, stringless snaps that are held above the plant for easy picking.

The violet-colored pods should be picked at 4-5 inches long for the best flavor and texture.

‘Purple Teepee’

Highly productive plants reach 18 inches in height and come to maturity in 60 days.

You can find packs of 100 ‘Purple Teepee’ seeds for purchase from Seedsown via Amazon.

29. Royal Burgundy

Living up to its lofty name, ‘Royal Burgundy’ is an overachiever. It has incredible disease and insect resistance, and is even able to germinate in cool soil.

A close up of a blue enamel container with purple and yellow Phaseolus vulgaris set on a blue rustic wooden surface on a soft focus background.

An open-pollinated heirloom introduced in 1976, this cultivar also goes by the names ‘Royal Purple Burgundy,’ ‘Royal Purple Pod,’ and ‘Royal Purple Podded.’

This is an excellent variety for gardeners dealing with cool spring or early summer temperatures, to which it is very tolerant.

Deep purple pods should be harvested at 5 inches or smaller, when they will be the most tender.

Theses snaps contain tan seeds and they have a mild taste.

Plants are dark green with purple tinted stems and petioles, reaching 24 inches in height.

‘Royal Burgundy’ stands up well to Mexican bean beetles, and has good resistance to mosaic virus, powdery mildew, and white mold.

A close up of a single Phaseolus vulgaris 'Red Burgundy' on the plant, surrounded by foliage. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text.

‘Royal Burgundy’

You’ll be gathering your harvest from this regal plant in 50 days.

You can find ‘Royal Burgundy’ seeds in an assortment of packet sizes, available for purchase at True Leaf Market.

30. Velour

Have you been waiting for a purple podded variety to grow in containers? ‘Velour’ is your bean!

A close up of purple Phaseolus vulgaris recently picked from the bush with foliage to the side.

‘Velour’ is an open-pollinated, heavy producer of 4- to 5-inch-long, stringless filet bush beans.

Pods are straight and slender, with a beautiful royal purple color and beige seeds.

These extra fine filet beans have a rich flavor and are excellent for eating fresh or freezing.

Plants are upright, medium sized, and compact, ideal for container gardens.

‘Velour’

‘Velour’ has high resistance to both mosaic virus and halo blight, and reaches maturity in 55 days.

‘Velour’ seeds are available from Violet Seeds via Amazon.

Romano Varieties

Also called “Italian green beans,” Romano beans are wide and flat compared to what we commonly think of as green beans.

A close up picture of a farmer's hands holding a large bunch of long podded Phaseolus vulgaris, leaning on a rustic wooden surface on a soft focus background.

Popular in Italy, these bush beans are fleshier than snap beans, with more pod to enjoy.

31. Dragon’s Tongue

I’m starting off our Romano bean selection with a colorful variety. ‘Dragon’s Tongue’ is an heirloom that turns yellow with purple streaks when it’s ready to harvest.

This prolific, open-pollinated cultivar is also known as ‘Dragon Tongue,’ ‘Dragon Langerie,’ ‘Merveille du Piemonte,’ and ‘Meraviglia del Piemonte.’

A close up of the Phaseolus vulgaris 'Dragon's Tongue' variety with light green and purple skin.

Pods are 6-8 inches long and stringless with a thick, tender texture and a sweet, buttery flavor.

Enjoyed raw, these bush beans are crunchy and juicy.

When cooked, ‘Dragon’s Tongue’ will lose its purple streaks, changing color to a solid yellow hue.

A close up of a Phaseolus vulgaris 'Dragon's Tongue' bush growing in the garden in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

Seeds are tan with speckles, and if left on the plant to mature, they can be used as shelling or dry beans.

Plants are on the large size, reaching 24-30 inches in height at maturity.

For these plants, more sun exposure will create a more striking bean color, so don’t crowd them, and make sure to provide full sun.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Dragon's Tongue' with purple and light green pods, set on a mesh surface with a ruler to the bottom of the frame and a flower to the left.

‘Dragon’s Tongue’

‘Dragon’s Tongue’ will be ready to harvest and enjoy in 60 days.

You can find seeds available in a variety of packet sizes at Arbico Organics.

32. Early Bush Italian

‘Early Bush Italian’ is an heirloom, open-pollinated variety that matures early and provides a hefty harvest.

A close up of a collection of green Phaseolus vulgaris beans.

Green pods are flat and stringless, reaching 5 1/2 inches in length, and are ready to harvest in just 50 days.

‘Early Bush Italian’ beans are tender with a robust flavor.

A close up of a wicker basket containing freshly picked Phaseolus vulgaris 'Early Bush Italian' pods which are flat and light green in color.

‘Early Bush Italian’

Vigorous plants are 16-18 inches tall and have good general disease resistance.

You can find ‘Early Bush Italian’ seeds in 2-ounce packets available at Burpee.

33. Green Crop

‘Green Crop’ is an award-winning Romano bush bean that you’ll appreciate for its abundant and early harvests.

A vertical close up picture of a Phaseolus vulgaris bush growing in the garden covered in light droplets of water, in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

This cultivar, an All-America Selections Winner in 1957, was introduced by the New Hampshire Agricultural Extension Service and the USDA in 1956.

Also known as ‘Greencrop,’ it is open-pollinated, and produces 8-inch-long green pods with white seeds in just 50-55 days.

Flat, wide pods are crisp and stringless, and they are extremely tasty whether cooked fresh, frozen, or canned.

A close up of small Phaseolus vulgaris 'Greencrop' plants growing in the garden surrounded by hay mulch.

‘Green Crop’

Plants grow to 12-24 inches in height and are resistant to mosaic virus.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available from Eden Brothers.

34. Jumbo

Living up to its name, ‘Jumbo’ is an Italian type bush bean that produces heavy yields of extra-long pods.

A close up of fresh long podded Phaseolus vulgaris cultivar set on a wooden surface, to the right of the frame is a brown and white checked cloth.

This open-pollinated cultivar is a cross between ‘Kentucky Wonder’ and ‘Romano.’

Pods are dark green, enclosing cream-colored seeds with dark brown stripes.

Tasty ‘Jumbo’ beans remain stringless up to 10 inches long, but are at their most tender when picked at 6-7 inches in length.

Plants are large for bush bean plants and can grow runners, but they do not require staking.

‘Jumbo’ has high resistance to mosaic virus, and will come to maturity in 55-60 days.

‘Jumbo’

This variety has lower than average germination rates, so make sure to plant plenty of seeds.

You can find packs of 60 ‘Jumbo’ seeds for purchase on Amazon.

35. Roma II

Our last bush bean for consideration is ‘Roma II.’ This open-pollinated heirloom will give you a large harvest of delicious, stringless, flat Italian beans.

A close up top down picture of a metal colander with long-podded beans that have been steamed and set on a wooden surface.

Pods are medium-green colored with white seeds, and are best picked when they are 4-5 inches long, after 50-55 days.

Sweet and nutty in flavor, ‘Roma II’ is a great bush bean for eating fresh and for freezing.

A close up of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Roma II' variety growing in the garden ready for harvest.

‘Roma II’

Bushy plants reach 18 inches tall and are resistant to mosaic virus, Northern leaf blight, papaya ring spot, and rust.

You can find ‘Roma II’ seeds in an assortment of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

Bushwhacking Through the Choices

All these different cultivars may seem like a jungle of bush beans to sort through – but everyone has different preferences and growing conditions, so this wide assortment of choices should allow you to find the bush bean variety that will work best in your garden.

A close up of various different colored bush beans set on a hessian surface, there are green, purple, and yellow varieties.

Here are a few selections that are on my planting list this summer: ‘Jade’ as a long snap, ‘Royal Burgundy’ as a purple pod, and ‘Gold Rush Wax’ as a yellow pod. I can’t wait to bring in my colorful harvests and turn them into yummy meals.

Which bush bean varieties are you planting this year? If you have any additional recommendations, please share!

How about planting some other vegetables to go along with your bush beans? Find inspiration from these guides next:


Don’t forget to Pin It!

A collage of photos showing various types of bush beans.

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Product photos via Arbico Organics, BasqueStore, Burpee, Eden Brothers, Seedsown, True Leaf Market, and Violet Seeds. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock.

About Kristina Hicks-Hamblin

Kristina Hicks-Hamblin lives on a dryland permaculture homestead in the high desert of Utah. Originally from the temperate suburbs of North Carolina, she enjoys discovering ways to meet a climate challenge. She is a Certified Permaculture Designer and a Building Biology Environmental Consultant, and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Kristina loves the challenges of dryland gardening and teaching others to use climate compatible gardening techniques, and she strives towards creating gardens where there are as many birds and bees as there are edibles. Kristina considers it a point of pride that she spends more money on seeds each year than she does on clothes.

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