15 of the Best Daffodil Cultivars for Naturalized Plantings

If your garden to-do list includes planting drifts of naturalized daffodils, carefully arranged to look like they popped up and spread of their own accord, it’s important to choose the right varieties.

A close up vertical image of a white daffodil flower with an orange center, growing in the garden with yellow blooms in soft focus in the background. To the center and bottom of the frame is green and white text.

Cultivars that will work for this purpose might be described as “good multipliers,” “vigorous,” or “suitable for naturalization.”

And since daffodils can keep multiplying for decades, you’ll want to choose types that you love.

I’ve made a list of 15 beautiful varieties sporting flowers of different hues – white, yellow, orange, and even pink!

All of the following cultivars will work well for naturalizing, and all of them have simple (rather than double) blooms, making them pollinator friendly.

Since you may want to organize your plantings to have a succession of flowers from late winter to early summer, I’ve listed the bloom time of each of these varieties to make your planning easier.

To learn how to create a naturalized planting of daffodils, with instructions and tips for selecting an area of the landscape to plant and how to create your layout, as well as determining how many bulbs you’re going to need, read our full guide.

1. Blushing Lady

This flower is sure to get a lot of compliments – and perhaps that’s why she’s blushing. Not only does ‘Blushing Lady’ have a unique color combination, she also has an outstanding fragrance.

‘Blushing Lady’ is a jonquil type narcissus with petals that are a soft, pastel yellow, and cups that are a salmon-pink hue.

This cultivar will bear up to three blossoms per 12-inch stem, and will bloom in late spring.

A close up square image of the bright yellow 'Blushing Lady' daffodils growing in a naturalized setting in the garden, on a soft focus background.

‘Blushing Lady’

A hybrid, ‘Blushing Lady’ originated in the USA.

You can find ‘Blushing Lady’ bulbs in bags of ten available from Burpee.

2. British Gamble

Perhaps the only gamble with this variety would be in betting your friends and family that you can grow daffodils with giant blooms.

The flowers on ‘British Gamble’ are huge, reaching five to six inches across.

‘British Gamble’ has white petals with a frilly trumpet that is lemon yellow to coral pink. These hybrid plants from the Netherlands will reach 18 to 24 inches in height and have very large, showy flowers.

A close up square image of 'British Gamble' daffodils growing in the garden.

‘British Gamble’

This cultivar blooms in early to mid-spring.

You can purchase six-packs of ‘British Gamble’ bulbs at Nature Hills Nursery.

3. Chromacolor

‘Chromacolor’ will make a bold statement in your naturalized drifts with its intensely colored corona.

This two-toned hybrid daffodil has overlapping white petals with a large, bright, coral pink colored cup. Blooms are very large, reaching five to six inches across.

A close up square image of the white flowers with orange centers of 'Chromacolor' daffodils, growing in drifts in the spring garden.

‘Chromacolor’

‘Chromacolor’ will bloom in mid-spring to early summer. Plants grow 18 to 20 inches tall.

You can find ‘Chromacolor’ bulbs in bags of 10 available at Burpee.

4. Dutch Master

With their renowned reputation for breeding flower bulbs, it’s no surprise that the Dutch have created a master – a ‘Dutch Master,’ that is.

‘Dutch Master’ has yellow petals and a frilly, yellow trumpet. This is a tall plant, growing to 26 inches in height or more.

A close up square image of a bright yellow 'Dutch Master' daffodil growing in the garden, pictured in sunshine on a soft focus background.

‘Dutch Master’

Blooms are very large, reaching four to five inches across. Heirloom ‘Dutch Master’ will bloom in early to mid-spring.

You can purchase ‘Dutch Master’ bulbs online from Burpee.

5. February Gold

Finding a flower that’s blooming in February is kind of like finding gold, isn’t it? ‘February Gold’ may make you think you have.

This cyclamen-flowered cultivar has yellow petals with a yellow trumpet, and blooms at the very tail end of winter, or very early in the spring.

A close up square image of a swath of 'February Gold' daffodils growing in a large swath in the garden.

‘February Gold’

An heirloom variety that originates in the Netherlands, ‘February Gold’ will grow to be eight to 12 inches tall.

You can find ‘February Gold’ bulbs in packs of 10 available at Burpee.

6. Fortune

You may not find gold bars when the winter snow melts, but you may find ‘Fortune,’ which isn’t such a bad recompense.

‘Fortune’ is an heirloom large-cupped variety, with rounded yellow petals and a very short, orange, funnel-shaped cup.

Large flowers are four to five inches wide and bloom in early to mid-spring.

A close up square image of yellow and orange 'Fortune' daffodils growing in the garden in bright sunshine, with white flowers in soft focus in the background.

‘Fortune’

This English daffodil hybrid will reach 18 to 20 inches tall, or sometimes more.

You can purchase ‘Fortune’ bulbs at Eden Brothers.

7. Geranium

Here’s a ‘Geranium’ that is hardy to -40°F.

Being the same species as the paperwhites you may be familiar with for forcing indoors in winter, Narcissus tazetta, this bunch-flowered daffodil species is more tolerant of mild winters than other members of the Narcissus genus.

‘Geranium’ has white petals with shallow yellow-orange cups. Another beautiful heirloom from the Netherlands, the blooms on this ‘Geranium’ are two to three inches wide.

A close up square image of the white and orange flowers of the 'Geranium' daffodil variety growing in the garden, pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

‘Geranium’

Each stem can reach 14 to 16 inches tall – or sometimes more! – and will bear up to six flowers starting in mid- to late spring.

You can purchase ‘Geranium’ bulbs in a variety of package sizes at Eden Brothers.

8. Holland Sensation

Do you get the feeling that another Dutch variety is forthcoming? Maybe you picked up on that ‘Holland Sensation.’

‘Holland Sensation’ has white petals with bright yellow trumpets. Plants can grow to be 20 inches tall or more, and will hold aloft one flower per stem, blooming in mid-spring.

A close up square image of the flowers of 'Holland Sensation' daffodils growing in the garden pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

‘Holland Sensation’

And yes, this hybrid variety was created in the Netherlands.

You can purchase an eight-pack of ‘Holland Sensation’ bulbs at Nature Hills Nursery.

9. Ice Follies

Fragrant flowers in early spring? Sound crazy? Maybe it sounds like ‘Ice Follies.’

‘Ice Follies’ has slightly overlapping white petals with large, frilled cups that are yellowish green fading to cream.

This large-cupped hybrid variety will grow to be 16 to 18 inches tall. Each stem bears a single three- to four-inch flower.

A close up square image of yellow and white 'Ice Follies' daffodils growing in the garden on a green soft focus background.

‘Ice Follies’

Flowers are fragrant and bloom in early to mid-spring.

You can purchase ‘Ice Follies’ in packets of eight bulbs at Nature Hills Nursery.

10. Mount Hood

Evoking the snowy peak of the famous volcano in Oregon, ‘Mount Hood’ has overlapping white petals with wavy margins, and cups that are white to cream-colored.

The long-lasting flowers on this heirloom daffodil variety are very large, reaching four to five inches across.

A close up square image of the delicate white flowers of 'Mount Hood' daffodils growing in the garden with foliage in soft focus in the background.

‘Mount Hood’

Plants grow to 15 to 17 inches in height and bloom in mid-spring.

You can purchase ‘Mount Hood’ bulbs in a variety of package sizes at Eden Brothers.

11. Pink Parasol

If you’re looking for something unique in your daffodils, you might choose one of the pink varieties, such as this pink-hued trumpet cultivar.

‘Pink Parasol’ has overlapping white petals and salmon-pink trumpets. Plants reach 14 to 16 inches in height and bloom in mid-spring.

A close up square image of of the delicate light pink 'Pink Parasol' daffodils growing in the garden.

‘Pink Parasol’

This gorgeous two-toned hybrid daffodil originated in the Netherlands.

You can purchase six-packs of ‘Pink Parasol’ bulbs at Nature Hills Nursery.

12. Professor Einstein

Perhaps gazing into the deeply contrasting cup of this spring flower will cause you to ponder the nature of the universe, in honor of its namesake.

‘Professor Einstein’ has overlapping, rounded white petals and a wide, reddish orange, crimped, disk-shaped cup.

A close up square image of the white flowers with orange centers of 'Professor Einstein' growing in the spring garden.

‘Professor Einstein’

These large-cupped daffodils grow to 12 to 26 inches tall and bloom in late spring.

You can purchase heirloom ‘Professor Einstein’ bulbs at Nature Hills Nursery.

13. Regeneration

Daffodils provide a sunny burst of color at the end of winter, but ‘Regeneration’ takes this idea rather literally, rising up to greet you in very early spring.

Its trumpet looks like a burst of white spreading onto a background of yellow petals.

‘Regeneration’ is a jonquil type hybrid that has lemon yellow petals, a creamy center, and a creamy white corona.

A close up square image of bright yellow 'Regeneration' daffodils growing in the garden pictured in bright sunshine.

‘Regeneration’

Each stem bears three to five flowers, and stems can reach between 12 to 26 inches in height.

‘Regeneration’ bulbs are available in packets of ten at Burpee.

14. Smiling Maestro

When this maestro stands up, everyone will give its bright flowers their full attention.

‘Smiling Maestro’ is a large-cupped hybrid daffodil that has rich yellow petals and a striking reddish-orange corona.

A close up square image of yellow and orange 'Smiling Maestro' daffodil growing in the garden.

‘Smiling Maestro’

Flowers are large, reaching four to five inches wide, posed on top of tall stems that reach 20 to 22 inches in height and bloom in mid-spring.

You can purchase ‘Smiling Maestro’ bulbs in bags of ten from Burpee.

15. Thalia

‘Thalia’ is a cultivar of N. triandrus, a species commonly called “Angel’s Tears.” Perhaps the angels are crying with joy because they’re just as happy at the return of spring as we are.

This heirloom variety has bright white petals and bright white cups, with two to four flowers per 14 to 20-inch stem.

A close up square image of the delicate white flowers of the daffodil variety 'Thalia' growing in the garden.

‘Thalia’

‘Thalia’ will bloom in mid- to late spring.

You can purchase ‘Thalia’ bulbs in packs of 10 at Burpee.

Daffy for Daffodils

I don’t know about you, but after this deep dive into the eye-catching attributes of these varieties, I’m feeling a bit giddy and want to plant enough drifts to include them all.

A close up horizontal image of white daffodils with orange centers growing in the garden surrounded by foliage with yellow flowers in soft focus in the background, pictured in light sunshine.

I’ll admit, though, I have a particular penchant for those with pink tones, and those are the ones that will find a home in my soil this fall.

Don’t forget to check out our full guide to growing daffodils to learn more, then grab your gardening journal and start planning!

Which daffodil cultivars have turned your head? Let me know in the comments below.

If you enjoy learning about different varieties of flowering bulbs, I’ll bet you enjoy these articles too:

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Product photos via Burpee, Eden Brothers, and Nature Hills Nursery. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock.

About Kristina Hicks-Hamblin

Kristina Hicks-Hamblin lives on a dryland permaculture homestead in the high desert of Utah. Originally from the temperate suburbs of North Carolina, she enjoys discovering ways to meet a climate challenge. She is a Certified Permaculture Designer and a Building Biology Environmental Consultant, and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Kristina loves the challenges of dryland gardening and teaching others to use climate compatible gardening techniques, and she strives towards creating gardens where there are as many birds and bees as there are edibles. Kristina considers it a point of pride that she spends more money on seeds each year than she does on clothes.

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Michael
Michael (@guest_9794)
1 month ago

When evaluating naturalized daffodils you need to imagine seeing a mass of the flowers from a distance. A pale flower with a pale pink or salmon colored corona will not pop. A bright yellow petal and corona is great, and the flower must be large, otherwise it looks like a buttercup. A deep red-orange corona is very good. These should be tall with strong stems. White is sweet, especially ivory or just a shade off pure white. Some, but not all of your suggestions satisfy.