11 of the Best Blue Asters to Add to the Garden

A close up of delicate daisy-like blooms in light purple, with yellow centers, of the perennial aster, pictured growing in the garden, and fading to soft focus in the background.

Asters are transitional flowers that bloom from summer to fall. There’s an array to choose from that includes dwarf and tall, as well as annual and perennial types, best known for their multiple daisy-like blossoms that attract a host of beneficial pollinators. Read on to find 11 of our favorite blue varieties now.

21 Tips for Managing Perennial Asters in the Garden

A close up of bright pink Symphyotrichum novae-angliae growing in the summer garden.

Perennial asters are vigorous plants that spread readily via self-sowing and extensive root systems. They have a clumping growth habit and masses of tiny, daisy-like blossoms. Colors include blue, pink, purple, and white. Read on to discover 21 tips for managing their aggressive nature and enjoying them in your yard.

11 of the Best Pink Aster Varieties

A close up of bright pink flowers growing in the garden in bright sunshine.

If you want to add a touch of pink to your landscape, vigorous asters bring swaths of color, texture, and vertical interest to summer and fall gardens. Discover 11 outstanding varieties, from ballerina pink to sizzling magenta, you’re sure to find your new favorites for beds, borders, containers, and carefree meadows.

When and How to Divide Perennial Asters

A close up of the bright purple flowers of the perennial aster plant, growing in the garden in light sunshine.

Perennial asters have daisy-like flowers and readily naturalize in the garden through self-sowing and an extensive root system. By dividing perennial asters you can keep them under control, growing vigorously, and enjoy them in other areas of the garden. Learn when and how to divide asters with our guide. Read more now.

When and How to Save Native Perennial Aster Seeds

A purple aster bush in full bloom, against a metal fence. The purple flowers have bright orange centers, and these contrast with the green leaves and shadows cast on the gray metal behind, in bright sunshine.

Native perennial asters, such as the New England species, spread vigorously via roots and self-sowing. At season’s end, they form copious quantities of cottony seed heads that you can collect, to save and sow in a new location next year, or share with friends. Learn when and how to gather native aster seeds now.