Top 33 Cucumber Varieties to Grow at Home

With so many different varieties of cucumber, Cucumis sativus, available, it can be hard to know which one to pick.

A vertical close up of long, ripe, dark green cucumbers growing on the vine in the garden, surrounded by foliage. To the middle and bottom of the frame is green and white text.

Cucumbers are members of the Cucurbitaceae family, and are usually divided into two groups: slicing and pickling.

Slicing varieties can grow up to 12 inches long, and are best enjoyed fresh, on sandwiches or salads. Pickling types are typically much shorter, up to six inches long.

“Burpless” types are usually thin-skinned, seedless, and do not contain cucurbitacin, the compound responsible for bitter flavor.

In this guide, we take a look at some of the best cucumber varieties to grow in your summer vegetable garden.

Slicing

Slicing varieties are grown predominantly for fresh eating. They are normally smooth skinned, with tender flesh.

1. Ashley

This heirloom cultivar is a prolific producer of dark green, six to eight-inch fruits, with a slight taper on the stem end.

A vining variety, ‘Ashley’ was bred at the South Carolina Truck Experimental Station in Charleston in 1956 for the southern fresh produce market. It is a cross between ‘Puerto Rico 40’ and ‘Marketer.’

A close up of a wooden box filled with Cucumis sativus 'Ashley' set on a wooden surface.

‘Ashley’

Fruits are ready to harvest in 65 days, and as this cultivar is resistant to downy mildew, it’s a good option for growers in hot, humid conditions.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

2. Burpless #26

This hybrid vining variety produces thin fruits up to 12 inches long, but they are usually best picked at eight or 10 inches.

A close up of a long Cucumis sativus growing in the garden, surrounded by foliage. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text.

‘Burpless #26’

With thin, dark green skin and mild flesh with no hint of bitterness, this variety is resistant to downy mildew and mosaic virus.

Long vines will require staking or trellising. Ready to harvest in 50 days, regular picking will encourage the vines to produce more fruit.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at True Leaf Market.

3. Bush Champion

‘Bush Champion’ is a prolific producer of eight to 11-inch fruit on compact plants. This hybrid bush type delivers straight, crisp, bright green cucumbers in just 60 days.

A close up of a wicker basket filled with Cucumis sativus 'Bush Champion' with tomatoes scattered around, set on the ground in the garden.

‘Bush Champion’

Ideal for container growing or raised bed gardening, this Burpee exclusive is resistant to mosaic virus.

Find packets of 60 or 150 seeds available at Burpee.

4. Dasher II

‘Dasher II’ is a dark green hybrid cultivar with excellent disease resistance. Vigorous vines produce slim, eight-inch, white-spined fruit in 55-60 days.

‘Dasher II’

Best grown on a fence or trellis for easy harvest., straight, uniform fruits have high resistance to scab and moderate resistance to mosaic virus, leaf spot, and powdery mildew.

You can find seeds available from David’s Garden Seeds via Amazon.

5. Diva

A winner of the All-America Selections award in 2002, ‘Diva’ is a hybrid cultivar that produces semi-glossy, thin-skinned fruits of six to eight inches long.

‘Diva’ is a mostly seedless variety with a sweet, mild flavor. High yields on vigorous vines are ready to harvest in 58 days.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Diva' set on a wooden chopping board. To the bottom right of the frame is a black circular logo with text.

‘Diva’

This cultivar is resistant to scab, and tolerant of downy and powdery mildew.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at True Leaf Market.

6. Early Pride

‘Early Pride’ is a hybrid cultivar that bears dark green, straight fruits of eight to nine inches long.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Early Pride' set on a wooden surface and sliced.

‘Early Pride’

Bred by Burpee, plants are resistant to powdery mildew and mosaic virus. Vines grow vigorously up a trellis or frame and produce an abundant harvest.

With a mild flavor, these burpless cucumbers are ready to pick in 55 days.

You can find packets of 30 seeds available at Burpee.

7. Fanfare

‘Fanfare’ is a hybrid cultivar producing slim, eight to nine-inch uniform fruits with excellent texture and flavor.

‘Fanfare’

Short, two to two and a half feet semi-determinate vines produce high yields in just 63 days. Ideal for container growing on the patio, this All-America Selections winner (1994) has deep green skin and sweet flesh.

You can find seeds available from Hazzard’s Seeds via Amazon.

8. Long Green Improved

‘Long Green Improved’ is a prolific heirloom cultivar with straight, 10 to 12-inch fruits with dark green skin.

Originally introduced in 1842, this cultivar was bred from an even older variety, ‘Long Green Turkey,’ dating back to as early as 1778.

A close up of 'Long Green Improved' set on a wooden surface, with water droplets and foliage scattered around.

‘Long Green Improved’

Vigorous, robust vines will require staking for straight, uniform fruits that mature in 65 days. This variety is well-suited to both slicing and pickling.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

9. Marketer

‘Marketer’ is an open-pollinated variety with a sweet, mild flavor. A winner of the All-America Selections award in the edibles category in 1943, it’s ideal for hot, humid Southern climates.

Dark green, smooth, slender fruits grow eight to nine inches long on vigorous vines and are ready to pick after 55 days.

A close up of a pile of Cucumis sativus 'Marketer' in a wicker basket.

‘Marketer’

‘Marketer’ was bred by Associated Seed Growers in Connecticut, and is a cross between ‘Straight Eight’ and ‘Vaughan.’ It was first introduced in 1942.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

10. Marketmore 76

‘Marketmore 76’ is a popular heirloom cultivar with impressive disease resistance. Dark green, slender, thick-skinned fruits measure eight to nine inches long, and mature in 67 days.

The original ‘Marketmore’ variety was developed by Dr. Henry Munger at Cornell University in 1968, and in 1976 he released ‘Marketmore 76,’ a vigorous, open-pollinated strain.

A close up of three freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Marketmore 76' set on a wooden surface.

‘Marketmore 76’

With a crisp crunch and sweet flavor, this variety has a small seed cavity and lends itself to both slicing and pickling.

Resistant to powdery and downy mildew, leaf spot, mosaic virus, and scab, this is a reliable producer in warmer climates.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

11. Muncher

‘Muncher’ is an open-pollinated cultivar producing medium-sized fruit up to nine inches long. Ideal for slicing, immature fruit can be picked at four to five inches for pickling.

A close up of three Cucumis sativus 'Muncher' set on a white surface with a flower in the background. To the bottom right of the frame is a black circular logo with text.

‘Muncher’

Vigorous vines produce heavy yields of light green, smooth, burpless cucumbers that are mild and sweet, ready to pick in 65 days.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at True Leaf Market.

12. Poinsett 76

‘Poinsett 76’ was developed by Dr. Henry Munger of Cornell University in 1976. Eight-inch fruits are tender, with crisp, white flesh and dark green skin.

A close up of a wicker basket with Cucumis sativus 'Poinsett 76' both whole and sliced.

‘Poinsett 76’

This hybrid cultivar is resistant to leaf spot, powdery and downy mildew, and anthracnose.

Strong, vigorous vines produce an abundance of burpless, mild cucumbers ideal for slicing or sandwiches.

You can find seeds available at Eden Brothers.

13. Salad Bush

‘Salad Bush’ is a compact hybrid bush variety ideal for container growing. Dark green eight-inch fruits are ready for harvest in 57 days.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Salad Bush' growing in the garden. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo with text.

‘Salad Bush’

This cultivar was a winner of the All-America Selections award in the edible category in 1988.

‘Salad Bush’ is resistant to mosaic virus, downy mildew, scab, and leaf spot.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at True Leaf Market.

14. Spacemaster

‘Spacemaster’ is an open-pollinated compact bush variety that produces six to eight-inch light green fruits in just 65 days.

Developed by Dr. Henry Munger of Cornell University, this cultivar was first brought to market in 1980.

A close up of a small wicker basket with freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Spacemaster' set on a wooden surface.

‘Spacemaster’

Ideal for container growing, the crisp, non-bitter cucumbers can be used for slicing or harvested early for pickling.

Plants are resistant to mosaic virus and scab, and have moderate resistance to downy and powdery mildew.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

15. Straight Eight

‘Straight Eight’ is an heirloom cultivar that produces eight-inch light green fruits with fine-grained flesh and great taste in just 65 days.

A close up of a sliced Cucumis sativus 'Straight Eight' set on a wooden chopping board.

‘Straight Eight’

The long, vigorous, trailing vines will appreciate support or trellising.

‘Straight Eight’ was introduced to the market in 1935 by Ferry-Morse Seeds, and won the All-America Selections award in the edible category the same year.

You can find seeds available in a variety of packet sizes at Eden Brothers.

16. Sugar Crunch

A compact hybrid cultivar, ‘Sugar Crunch’ produces an abundance of crisp, crunchy fruit with smooth, light green skin.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Sugar Crunch' in a metal basket.

‘Sugar Crunch’

Best picked at four to five inches long, they are ideal for slicing, with a sweet, mild flavor. They are also suitable for pickling.

Fruits mature in 57 days.

Find packets of 30 seeds available at Burpee.

17. Sweet Slice

‘Sweet Slice’ is a hybrid cultivar with ten to 12-inch, crisp, tender fruits with thin, dark green skin and a sweet, mild flavor with no hint of bitterness.

‘Sweet Slice’

Ready for harvest in 55-62 days, ‘Sweet Slice’ produces burpless cucumbers that require no peeling.

Find seeds from Hometown Seeds via Amazon.

18. Sweet Success

‘Sweet Success’ is a seedless hybrid that produces 12- to 14-inch seedless, thin-skinned fruit with a mild, sweet taste.

An All-America Selections winner in the edible category in 1983, ‘Sweet Success’ grows on vigorous vines and is ready to harvest in just 54 days.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Sweet Success' in a wooden bowl.

‘Sweet Success’

‘Sweet Success should be grown on a trellis or staked. This cultivar is resistant to mosaic virus, scab, powdery mildew, and leaf spot.

Packets of 15 seeds are available at Burpee.

19. Tanja

‘Tanja’ is a highly productive open-pollinated cultivar that produces 12-inch slender cucumbers that are firm and crunchy.

Without a hint of bitterness, the flavor is mild, almost sweet.

A close up of freshly harvested Cucumis sativus sliced and set on green leaves.

‘Tanja’

Vigorous vines will require trellising to produce uniformly straight fruit.

Ready to pick in 60 days, plants continue to produce over a long harvest period.

Seeds are available from Territorial Seeds via Arbico Organics.

20. Tendergreen Burpless

Also known as ‘Burpless Tendergreen,’ this heirloom cultivar produces mild, burpless cucumbers with dark green skin, thin skin.

Best harvested at eight inches or less, ‘Tendergreen Burpless’ is suitable for slicing or pickling.

A close up of freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Tendergreen Burpless' set on a wooden surface.

‘Tendergreen Burpless’

Plants are vigorous growers, and are resistant to powdery and downy mildew. Harvest after 55 days.

Seeds are available in a variety of packet sizes from Eden Brothers.

Pickling

Pickling cucumbers are shorter, with more spines, and they typically have drier flesh with a lower water content. Some varieties are dual-purpose, suitable for both slicing and pickling.

21. Boston Pickling

‘Boston Pickling’ is an heirloom cultivar that is suitable for both pickling and slicing. Three to six-inch long, bright green fruits with crisp flesh grow on vigorous vines.

A close up of a pile of freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Boston Pickling' set on a white surface.

‘Boston Pickling’

This cultivar was first introduced by Wood and Sons in 1880. Cucumbers are ready to harvest after 55 days.

Find seeds available at Eden Brothers.

22. Burpee Pickler

A hybrid cultivar, ‘Burpee Pickler’ grows long, vigorous vines and produces heavy yields of black-spined, medium green, three to five-inch fruits with blunt tips.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Burpee Pickler' set on a countertop in the ktichen.

‘Burpee Pickler’

Tolerant to mosaic virus, fruits are ready to harvest in 53 days.

Find packets of 100 seeds available at Burpee.

23. Bush Pickle

‘Bush Pickle’ is a hybrid cultivar ideal for containers or smaller gardens. It has a compact bushy growth habit, and produces a large number of light green, four to five-inch fruits.

A close up of a small Cucumis sativus growing in the garden, with a yellow flower to the left of the frame and a white circular logo with text at the bottom right.

‘Bush Pickle’

Sweet and tender fruits are ready for harvest after 50 days.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes at True Leaf Market.

24. Calypso

‘Calypso’ is a hybrid cultivar developed at the North Carolina Agriculture Research Station. It produces high yields of three-inch, firm fruit, an inch in diameter.

‘Calypso’

Dark green cucumbers with minimal white spines mature in 52 days, and are ideal for pickling but can also be enjoyed sliced.

‘Calypso’ exhibits resistance to powdery mildew, mosaic virus, and anthracnose.

Seeds are available from David’s Garden Seeds via Amazon.

25. Carolina

A hybrid cultivar, ‘Carolina’ is a compact vining type with medium green fruits of three to four inches long.

A close up of a pile of freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Carolina' set on the ground in the garden.

‘Carolina’

Developed at Clemson University in South Carolina, disease-resistant plants produce high yields in just 55 days.

Find 100-seed packets available from Everwilde Farms via Walmart.

26. Fancipak

A hybrid cultivar, ‘Fancipak’ produces uniform fruit with tender skin and a blocky shape.

‘Fancipak’

Medium to large vines with dense foliage protect the developing fruit from sunscald, which makes it a good choice for growing in hotter climates.

Medium green four-inch cukes are ready to harvest in about 54 days.

Resilient plants are resistant to mosaic virus, downy and powdery mildew, scab, and anthracnose.

Find seeds available on Amazon.

27. Homemade Pickles

‘Homemade Pickles’ is an heirloom cultivar. Also known as ‘Southern Homemade Pickles,’ this is a vigorous bush variety that produces an abundance of five to six-inch fruits.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Homemade Pickles' set on a wooden surface, pictured in bright sunshine with foliage in the background.

‘Homemade Pickles’

The crisp texture and sweet flavor make this variety a popular choice for pickling as well as fresh eating.

Harvest when small for baby sweet pickles, and expect 55-60 days to full maturity.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

28. Little Leaf H-19

Emerald green three to five-inch fruits grow on compact multi-branching vines. ‘Little Leaf H-19’ is a hybrid cultivar bred in 1991 at the University of Arkansas.

‘Little Leaf H-19’

Smaller than what you will typically see on most cultivars, the leaves improve visibility for harvesting, and plants can be grown in containers or in small space gardens.

Excellent both for pickling and fresh eating, this variety is resistant to mosaic virus, powdery and downy mildew, and scab.

Find seeds available from David’s Garden Seeds via Amazon.

29. National Pickling

Also known as ‘National Pickle’ or ‘National Association Pickling,’ this cultivar was bred in 1924 at the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station for the National Pickle Packers Association.

Vigorous medium-length vines produce large yields of six-inch crispy, tender-skinned cucumbers.

A close up of a pile of Cucumis sativus 'National Pickling' set on a wooden tray.

‘National Pickling’

You can harvest two-inch baby gherkins for pickling, and larger fruits are ideal for slicing.

Plants are resistant to mosaic virus and ready to harvest in 55 days.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

30. Parisian

A French heirloom cultivar, ‘Parisian Pickling’ was first listed in seed catalogs in the US in 1892 by J. H. Gregory.

Used extensively in commercial production in Europe in the late 19th century, three to six-inch fruits grow on semi-vining plants.

A close up of a wicker basket containing a pile of freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Parisian.'

‘Parisian Pickling’

An All-American Selections winner in 2015, ‘Parisian Pickling’ is disease resistant and suitable for growing in containers and raised bed gardens, ready to harvest in 55 days.

Find packets of 30 seeds available at Burpee.

31. Pick a Bushel

A hybrid cultivar, ‘Pick a Bushel’ is a semi-bush variety that produces an abundance of sweet, crisp fruits with light green skin.

A close up of Cucumis sativus 'Pick a Bushel' set on a wooden surface.

‘Pick a Bushel’

An All-America Selections winner in 2014, ‘Pick a Bushel’ is ideal for growers in northern regions, with fruits that are ready to harvest in 50 days.

Fruits are best picked when they are between three and six inches long, and the compact vines are suitable for small space gardens or container growing.

Plants are resistant to mosaic virus and scab.

Packets of 30 seeds are available at Burpee.

32. Picklebush

‘Picklebush’ is a hybrid cultivar bred by Burpee, with compact vines and a bushy growth habit. White-spined 4.5-inch fruit have that classic pickle look: green with pale stripes.

A close up of a basket of freshly harvested Cucumis sativus 'Picklebush' set on the ground in the garden.

‘Picklebush’

Plants are resistant to powdery mildew and mosaic virus.

This variety is ideal for growing in containers or in small gardens, and provides an abundant harvest after 52 days.

Find packets of 50 seeds available at Burpee.

33. Supremo

‘Supremo’ is a Burpee exclusive hybrid cultivar with compact bushy vines that produce a prolific harvest of three to four-inch, dark green, striped fruits.

A close up of a wooden bowl containing Cucumis sativus 'Supremo.'

‘Supremo’

Suitable for container growing, plants are disease resistant, and these are ready to pick after 52 days.

Find packets of 30 seeds available at Burpee.

Which Variety Is Right for You?

Armed with this lengthy list of cucumber cultivars to choose from, you’re sure to find one perfect for your growing conditions and personal taste.

If you’re just getting started, be sure to check out our cucumber growing guide for everything you need to know.

A close up of a small cucumber growing in the garden, pictured in light filtered sunshine with foliage in soft focus in the backgrounds.

Do you want to grow long slicing types, or petite picklers? Let us know your favorites in the comments below!

And for more information on growing other vegetables in your garden, you’ll need these guides next:


Don’t forget to Pin It!

Collage of photos showing cucumbers growing on the vine.

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Originally published on February 19, 2019. Last updated July 20, 2020. Product photos via Amazon, Arbico Organics, Burpee, David’s Garden Seeds, Eden Brothers, Everwilde Farms, Hazzard’s Seeds, Hometown Seeds, and True Leaf Market. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock. With additional writing and editing by Clare Groom.

About Gretchen Heber

A former garden editor for a daily newspaper in Austin, Texas, Gretchen Heber goes through entirely too many pruners and garden gloves in a year’s time. She’s never met a succulent she didn’t like and gets really irritated every 3-4 years when Austin actually has a freeze cold enough to kill them. To Gretchen, nothing is more rewarding than a quick dash to the garden to pluck herbs to season the evening meal. And it’s definitely time for a happy dance when she’s able to beat the squirrels to the peaches, figs, or loquats.

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Jay Tracy
Jay Tracy (@guest_5489)
8 months ago

Dear Gretchen,

I have an incredible cucumber variety called the Striped Carosello Leccese. It is much better of a slicing cucumber than anything else I have ever tried. It is tender, yet crisp and juicy. It is bitter-free and does not cause indigestion. This variety is an ancient heirloom from southern Italy and loves the heat. Could I send you some seeds to grow out?

Respectfully,
-Jay

Christi Roberts
Christi Roberts (@guest_6001)
Reply to  Jay Tracy
4 months ago

JAY – you can send me some!

Oscar
Oscar (@guest_5747)
6 months ago

Does anybody know what type of cucumber this is? I tried them risking to poison myself but it started growing on my backyard, I guess because of bird droppings so I though if?it’s goog for them?might be good for me! Their like hardly 1 inch long and are pale green then turn black purpurish.

George Heber
George Heber (@guest_8462)
1 month ago

Hello Gretchen just wondering if we could be related. Thanks for your informative articles on cucumbers.
George Heber.

makonese flossy
makonese flossy (@guest_8564)
1 month ago

i want to learn more on cucumbers and when they can be grown. the type of soil is important to me.

Allison Sidhu
Allison Sidhu (@allison-sidhu)
Admin
Noble Member
Reply to  makonese flossy
1 month ago
Tracy
Tracy (@guest_8729)
1 month ago

Aloha Gretchen- I purchased some seeds from a local seed store in Hawaii simply named “Cucumber, American Variety.” So far, the plant is doing well and I just put in some stakes (3 of them, teepee style) so that the tendrils had something to grab on to. What the package doesn’t tell me is how high these will grow. I’ve tried to contact the local seed store but they have closed due to pandemic. I planted them on 5/23 and I’m guessing they’ll be ready to harvest around end of July. Any tips? I haven’t grown cucumbers before. Hawaii weather… Read more »

Allison Sidhu
Allison Sidhu (@allison-sidhu)
Admin
Noble Member
Reply to  Tracy
27 days ago

Hi Tracy, ‘American Variety,’ huh? That could be tricky to figure out, but the first thing that comes to mind is that this is your typical slicing, burpless cuke, sometimes referred to as ‘American Slicing.’ Since different cultivars come in all different sizes (and you haven’t been able to reach anyone at the seed store), you’re right that your best bet is to keep the average maturation rate for cucumber in mind (50-70 days) and go from there. The length of the vines as well as the size of the mature fruit can vary depending on the cultivar so you’ll… Read more »

Kevin
Kevin (@guest_8763)
29 days ago

I have been growing cucumbers that are between 10-15 long. What is the name given to them?

Allison Sidhu
Allison Sidhu (@allison-sidhu)
Admin
Noble Member
Reply to  Kevin
27 days ago

Can you send a picture, Kevin? There are several large cultivars out there, such as ‘Sweet Success’ and ‘Burpless #26.’ But keep in mind as I mentioned to Tracy that the longer you keep cucumbers on the vine, the more likely this is to result in a loss of crisp texture and a bitter flavor. Most cultivars should be picked at the peak size for their cultivar rather than allowing them to continue to grow to a huge size.