13 of the Best Dill Varieties for Your Herb Garden

Dill, Anethum graveolens, is a biennial herb, usually grown as an annual. It has delicate, aromatic foliage, and large umbels with bright yellow flowers.

A close up of the foliage of Anethum graveolens growing in the garden with soil in soft focus in the background. To the center and bottom of the frame is green and white text.

Suitable for gardeners in USDA Hardiness Zones 3-9, there are a number of different varieties available that vary in size, time to maturity, and flavor. Its feathery foliage and delicate flowers make a decorative, fragrant addition to borders.

It’s often grown as a companion plant in the vegetable garden.

A close up of the delicate yellow flowers of Anethum graveolens growing in the garden on a soft focus background.

Every variety is flavorful and can be used for those classic dill recipes like pickling, as a topping for fish, or in potato salad. Some are more suitable for container growing, and others go to seed earlier, ideal for use in cut flower arrangements.

Check out our guide to learn more about how to grow dill in your garden.

This member of the Apiaceae family enjoys moist, fertile soil, and is best sown in spring, as hot and dry weather can cause it to bolt.

In this article, I’m going to share 13 of my favorite varieties of A. graveolens, so you can choose yours!

Here’s what I’ll cover:

Before we jump in, let’s quickly clarify our terms:

Dill weed is the phrase people use to describe the leafy parts of the plant, whereas dill usually refers to the entire plant.

Ready to get started?

1. Bouquet

This variety gets its name because it’s often used in cut flower bouquets, thanks to its tall stems and big, showy umbels of bright yellow flowers.

It features beautiful dark-= green foliage, which makes it ideal if you want an ornamental plant for your garden that is also edible.

In other words, this dill does it all. Perhaps that’s why it’s one of the most commonly grown types.

If you want to make pickles, this is an exceptional option thanks to its abundant seeds. It’s also frequently used for making a soothing tea.

A close up of the yellow umbels of Anethum graveolens 'Bouquet' growing in the garden, with flowers in soft focus in the background. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo and text.

‘Bouquet’

‘Bouquet’ grows up to the feet tall at maturity, and the leaves are ready for harvest in 40-60 days.

It’s quick to flower – in only 85-100 days, which is good or bad depending on your goals, since flowering means the leaves will start to die back and lose their appealing flavor.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at True Leaf Market.

2. Compatto

‘Compatto’ is a compact variety with blue-green foliage and a bold, aromatic taste.

A close up of the feathery foliage of dill pictured growing in the garden on a soft focus background.

It grows to a diminutive 12-18 inches tall at maturity, and is slow to bolt. Plants are somewhat drought and heat tolerant.

Leaves are ready to harvest in just 40-50 days. It’s the perfect size if you’re looking for a container herb.

3. Delikat

‘Delikat’ has abundant, thick, dense foliage. It’s a reliable producer, and has a heavy leaf and seed yields compared to other dill varieties.

A close up of the large yellow umbel of a dill plant growing in the garden in bright sunshine with a brick wall in the background.

It grows about 10-24 inches tall at maturity and foliage is ready to harvest in about 40 days, with seeds maturing in 90 days.

4. Dukat

‘Dukat’ dill, also known as ‘Tetra,’ is a Danish variety that is slower to bolt than other types. With an intense flavor, it’s a good option if your primary goal is to harvest the leaves for cooking.

A close up of freshly harvested umbels, seeds, and foliage of Anethum graveolens 'Dukat' set on a wooden surface.

‘Dukat’

‘Dukat’ has a high oil content, which makes it especially aromatic and flavorful.

This variety tops out at about one to two feet tall at maturity, which makes it ideal for growing in a container.

The leaves are ready for harvest in 40-50 days, and the seeds are good to go in about 90-100 days.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

5. Elephant

‘Elephant’ is a late-flowering cultivar that’s slow to bolt – so you can get in a longer season of clipping the dark green leaves.

A close up of a bunch of 'Elephant' dill weed set on a wooden surface.

‘Elephant’

Mild-flavored leaves mature in between 60-90 days, and seeds are ready at 110-140 days.

With a mature height of four feet tall and a spread of two feet, ‘Elephant’ can be planted in borders or raised garden beds.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes available at Eden Brothers.

6. Fernleaf

A winner of the All-America Selections award in 1992, ‘Fernleaf’ matures to a petite 18 inches tall, with a compact growth habit. It’s ideal for growing in a container or a small herb garden.

The leaves, as you might have guessed, have a bushy fern-like appearance. I love to use them in flower bouquets as a filler because not only are they pretty, they have that incredible dill scent as well.

A close up of 'Fernleaf' dill foliage, fading to soft focus in the background. To the bottom right of the frame is green and white text.

‘Fernleaf’

‘Fernleaf’ also makes a beautiful specimen plant in the ornamental garden, or it is suited to growing in a container indoors.

After cutting, the leaves retain their flavor for longer than some other varieties. ‘Fernleaf’ is ready to harvest in 40-60 days for the leaves, and 90-100 days for the seeds.

Find seeds in a variety of packet sizes at True Leaf Market.

7. Greensleeves

‘Greensleeves,’ sometimes referred to with the alternate spelling ‘Green Sleeves,’ is resistant to bolting and produces an abundance of dark green leaves with a sweet, mild flavor.

It grows to a relatively compact height of 30 inches tall, and has a long harvest window. Suitable for growing in containers, you can harvest the leaves in 45 days.

Seeds mature in about 100 days.

8. Hera

‘Hera’ is slow to bolt and has dark green, almost blue leaves. Considered a “bunching” variety, fragrant leaves mature in 40-60 days, and the seeds are ready 50 days later.

A close up of the delicate green foliage of Anethum graveolens 'Hera' growing in the garden pictured on a soft focus background.

‘Hera’

Growing to a compact size of 12-18 inches at maturity, ‘Hera’ works well for container growing.

Find seeds in packets of 400, available at Burpee.

9. Herkules

‘Herkules,’ also known as ‘Hercules,’ grows to an impressive three feet tall at maturity, with lots of long, arching leaves.

It produces massive flower heads and is slow to bolt. The downside is that the older leaves tend to lose some flavor, and you may need to stake it because of its height.

A close up of the long stalks and feathery green fronds of Anethum graveolens 'Herkules' growing in the garden with a brick wall in the background.

‘Herkules’

This is a great option if you want to attract beneficial insects like bees and butterflies.

Pluck the leaves after 40-60 days. The seeds are mature in between 90 and 100 days.

You can find packets of 400 seeds available at Burpee.

10. Mammoth Long Island

‘Mammoth Long Island,’ aka ‘Mammoth’ or just ‘Long Island’ dill, is a large cultivar.

A vertical close up picture of 'Mammoth Long Island' a large dill cultivar growing in the garden.

It averages about three feet tall, but in the right conditions, it can grow up to six feet tall at maturity.

It’s popular for its large, flavorful leaves that are perfect for chopping up and sprinkling on fish. Because of its large size, this variety may require staking.

A close up of the tiny yellow flowers of Anethum graveolens 'Mammoth Long Island' growing in the garden on a soft focus background. To the bottom right of the frame is a white circular logo and text.

‘Mammoth Long Island’

The leaves are ready to harvest after just 65 days, and the seeds are ripe around 110 days after planting.

You can find seeds in a variety of packet sizes at True Leaf Market.

11. Superdukat

‘Superdukat’ is a heavy producer that is slow to flower. I’ve harvested this variety for three straight months, with no need for succession sowing.

Its abundant foliage has a high oil content, for an intensely aromatic flavor.

‘Superdukat’

‘Superdukat’ can grow up to five feet tall at maturity. Plants tend to grow uniformly and quite straight, and stems may need staking.

It takes 40-50 days to reach leaf harvest, and 90-100 days for seed harvest.

You can find seeds available on Amazon.

12. Teddy

‘Teddy’ grows fast, with dense foliage in an upright form. This cultivar has thicker leaves than the typically fine, delicate ones you see on other dill plants.

A dwarf variety, ‘Teddy’ is a good candidate for container growing.

The leaves are ready in 45-55 days and the seeds can be harvested in between 95 and 115 days.

13. Vierling

‘Vierling’ is an heirloom variety with dark blue leaves and thick stems. It is slow to bolt.

The seed heads are popular with commercial florists for use in cut flower arrangements. In the garden, it attracts beneficial insects and pollinators.

‘Vierling’ tops out at about 36-60 inches tall at maturity.

‘Vierling’

This dill weed is ready to harvest in 45 days, and the seeds are good to go in 95 days.

You can find seeds available in capsules, to store in the freezer prior to planting, from Frozen Seed Capsules via Amazon.

There’s a Dill Out There For Everyone

I adore dill, not least because it’s so versatile. To liven up bouquets, as an ingredient cooking, as a calming tea, to flavor pickling liquid… dill can do it all.

A close up of the foliage of Anethum graveolens growing in the garden, fading to soft focus in the background.

With so many varieties available, there’s something for you, whatever your goals.

Are you growing dill in your garden? What variety have you chosen? Let me know in the comments below!

And for more information about growing herbs in your garden, check out the following guides next:

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Product photos via Burpee, Eden Brothers, Frozen Seed Capsules, True Leaf Market, and Ukrainian Real Seeds. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock. With additional writing and editing by Clare Groom and Allison Sidhu.

About Kristine Lofgren

Kristine Lofgren is a writer, photographer, reader, and gardening lover from outside Portland, Oregon. She was raised in the Utah desert, and made her way to the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest with her husband and two dogs in 2018. Her passion is focused these days on growing ornamental edibles, and foraging for food in the urban and suburban landscape.

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