35 of the Best Strawberry Varieties for Home Gardeners

A homegrown harvest of sweet summertime strawberries, warmed by the sun, is one of life’s great pleasures.

And there is a huge variety of cultivars out there – over 200 currently – for your fresh eating, jam-making, and pie-filling pleasure.

A close up of red ripe strawberries, growing on the plant with bright green foliage fading to a dark soft focus background. To the center and bottom of the frame is green and white text.

We’ve put together a thorough roundup of 35 of what we believe to be the best types, with information on growing zones, growth habits, berry quality, disease resistance, and more.

This will make it easier for you to pick the best strawberry cultivars for your location and gardening style.

While some are tried-and-true favorites, others are newly popular. Whether you’re looking for that classic strawberry flavor or something a little different, we’re confident that our list will not disappoint.

Let’s get growing!

Strawberry Plant Qualities and Terms You Should Know

First up, if you need a more thorough refresher on what these plants are all about and how to care for them, take a look at our guide to growing strawberries at home.

Here, I’ll provide a quick recap that will help you to understand the terminology used in the descriptions below.

A close up of bright red, ripe strawberries growing on the plant in the garden, with bright green foliage, fading to soft focus in the background.

While most varieties of cultivated strawberries that you’ll come across are members of the Fragaria x ananassa species, some are alpine or wild cultivars of F. vesca. We’ll point these out for you, as well as any others belonging to a species other than the typical F. x ananassa.

Strawberries with a mounding habit produce growth both vertically and horizontally, giving the plants a rounded appearance. Those with a prostrate habit, also referred to as spreading or creeping, tend to produce growth more horizontally, spreading across the ground.

A top down close up of a 'Toscana' strawberry plant with bright pink flowers, growing in the garden with soil in the background.

Prostrate varieties are great for raised beds and larger planting spaces, whereas mounding varieties are well-suited to containers and hanging planters.

You’ve probably heard about chill hours in tree fruits before, and these apply to strawberries as well.

Most types have a certain number of required chill hours, while a few do not. What this means is if they don’t receive the required number of hours between 45 and 32°F, blossoms may not develop fully or open, resulting in lower yields.

This tally includes hours before and after harvest, when plants are dormant. Most strawberry plants require 200-300 chill hours for the best fruit production.

A close up of bright red, ripe strawberries contrasting with the light green foliage in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

How is this relevant to home growers?

The main factor here is that if you live in a location that doesn’t experience cold wintertime weather, certain cultivars will not produce fruit, or yields will be small.

Most types tend to be more productive after their first year of growth, and growers remove blossoms during the first year. Though it’s tempting to get that first harvest going (I know!) removing the first-year blooms (or at least the first batch of these – more on that later) helps the plants to put their energy into healthy root and runner development.

Strong, healthy plants that don’t have to put huge amounts of energy into flower and fruit production in the first year produce better fruit in the following season.

Strawberries are perennial plants, and most remain productive with good yields for three to four years. Many growers propagate plants from runners while others start new plants every couple of seasons. Propagating at home is not permitted for some patented varieties.

A close up of a strawberry plant with a variety of bright red, ripe fruit hanging from the branch, in light sunshine and bright green foliage in the background.

Though strawberry flowers are dioecious, meaning they have both male and female parts on each blossom, self-pollination is sometimes not enough to achieve high yields.

Strawberries are self-fertile, with varying levels of success depending on the cultivar and growing conditions, and they are pollinated by wind and insects as well.

A close up of rows of strawberry plants with ripe red fruits growing in the garden in bright sunshine fading to soft focus in the background.

You’ll also be faced with another choice in terms of harvest, with three options to choose from:

Everbearing varieties produce three crops, during spring, summer, and fall. During the heat of the summer, most of these tend to produce less fruit than they do during the other two harvest periods. And they generally produce fewer runners than other types as well.

Many growers will remove blossoms from their first-year everbearing plants until around June 1st, and then allow later blossoms to develop into fruit for two harvests in the first year.

June-bearing types produce one large crop over the course of about a month during the spring, and these may be further broken down into early, mid-season, and late varieties. This relates to bloom time, and the production of fruit to follow.

Remove all of the flowers from June-bearing strawberry cultivars during the first year of growth, so they can devote their energy to developing strong roots and runners.

Finally, day-neutral cultivars are kind of like indeterminate tomatoes. Flower and fruit production are ongoing through the growing season, as long as temperatures don’t dip below 35°F, or soar above 85°F in the case of a summertime heatwave.

Like everbearing types, these produce few runners, and flowers should be removed from first-year plants until the beginning of June. After that, you can allow your baby plants to develop fruit through the summer and into the fall.

A close up of deep red, ripe strawberries on a white background.

What does this mean for planning and planting?

Well, it all depends on where you live.

In cold USDA Hardiness Zones 6 and lower, strawberries should be planted in the spring. This gives them enough time to become established before the cold winter weather sets in.

Growers in warm Zones 7 and up typically plant around Labor Day for harvests beginning the following spring.

35 of the Best Strawberry Cultivars

In addition to our descriptions of the best cultivars and what they have to offer, we’ve included a selection of strawberry seeds, bare roots, and live plants that are available from our trusted affiliates.

It’s time to pick your favorites and start planning the berry patch of your dreams!

1. AC Wendy

A vigorous early-season ‘Evangeline’ cross developed at the Kentville research station in Nova Scotia, ‘AC Wendy’ is known for its runner production and high fruit yields. This variety isn’t picky – it does well in full sun and can be planted in both light and heavy soils.

A close up of bright red, ripe strawberries fading to soft focus in the background.

Conical to wedge-shaped large fruits ripen early on this cold-tolerant June-bearing variety, which thrives in Zones 4-8.

The berries have a firm texture and are known for holding up well to freezer storage after harvest. But since they produce their white flowers early, this also means there’s a potential for frost damage. Be sure to protect your crops in the case of a late freeze.

A close up of the 'AC Wendy' variety of bright red fruits.

‘AC Wendy’

Vigorous growers with a prostrate habit, a mature height of 12 inches, and a spread of 24-36 inches, these plants are moderately resistant to powdery mildew and red stele fungal disease. But they are susceptible to verticillium wilt and angular leaf spot.

Packages of 25 bare root plants are available from Burpee.

2. Albion

These day-neutral sweeties have a high sugar content and they’re sure to please in terms of flavor. A cross of ‘Diamante’ and ‘Cal 94.16-1’ developed at the University of California and released in 2006, ‘Albion’ produces long, conical fruit with a firm texture.

A top down close up of an 'Albion' plant growing in a terra cotta pot with flat green leaves set on a white surface.

Resistant to verticillium wilt, Phytophthora crown rot, and anthracnose crown rot, this type is known for producing high yields of one to three pints of fruit per plant.

‘Albion’ does best if grown in full sun in Zones 4-8 (though some claim there’s some wiggle room here, expanding that range to Zones 3-9). Fragrant white flowers are attractive to pollinators.

A close up of a plastic basket containing the bright red fruits of the 'Albion' variety.

‘Albion’

With a mounded growth habit, height of 12 inches, and spread of 24-36 inches at maturity, 500 chill hours are required for good yields. With a moderate to fast growth rate, expect 90 days to harvest.

Packages of 25 bare root plants are available from Burpee.

3. All Star

A reliable cultivar developed by the USDA and plant breeders at the University of Maryland, this cross of ‘US 4419’ and ‘MDVS 3184’ was first released in 1981.

A close up of the 'All Star' variety of strawberry, ripe and unripe fruit still on the vine set on a dark, soil surface, fading to soft focus in the background.

‘All Star’ (or ‘Allstar’) has white flowers, and large fruit with a sweet and mild flavor. A firm texture means your harvest will hold up well to freezer storage.

This midseason June-bearing variety is highly resistant to red stele, and moderately resistant to verticillium wilt. It can even be planted in clay or sandy soils.

A close up of a wooden container with red ripe 'All Star' strawberries set on a green lawn.

‘All Star’

Plants are suited to Zones 6-8, where they will grow to a height of about 10 inches with a spread of 18 inches.

Bare root plants in packages of 25 are available from Bonnie Plants via Home Depot.

4. Alpine Alexandria

An heirloom alpine type, ‘Alexandria’ is a cultivar of F. vesca. It produces white flowers and teeny-tiny berries known for their delicious and distinct flavor and texture.

A close up of the bright green leaves of the 'Alpine Alexandria' plant growing in the garden with small white flowers and bright green leaves, pictured in light sunshine on a soft focus background.

High yielding, runnerless, everbearing plants are happiest with some room to spread out, at least 18 inches between plants, and this type is also suited to growing as a ground cover. Grow it in containers if you don’t want it to spread.

A close up of a hand holding two tiny bright red strawberries of the 'Alpine Alexandria' variety with bright green foliage and unripe fruit in the background.

‘Alpine Alexandria’

Planted in full sun to partial shade in Zones 6-8, you can expect this type to reach a height of 8-10 inches.

Plants are available from Burpee.

5. Alpine Yellow Wonder

Looking for something a little different? How about strawberries that ripen to a pale yellow color?

Known for their gourmet flavor and an aroma reminiscent of pineapple, these tiny treats are less attractive to birds than their red counterparts, so there’s sure to be plenty of fruit left on the plant for you when harvest time rolls around.

This everbearing F. vesca cultivar produces white flowers, and is known for its high yields of small berries that are easy to pick from their stems.

A close up of a hand holding 'Alpine Yellow Wonder' fruits which are yellow with darker yellow spots.

‘Alpine Yellow Wonder’

‘Yellow Wonder’ does best in full sun in Zones 6-8. It has a prostrate growth habit, height of 8-10 inches at maturity, and a spread of 14-18 inches.

Plants are available from Burpee.

6. Alpine White Soul

Not only does this F. vesca cultivar boast a ghostly white color when ripe, it has an unusual flavor as well. Some say these taste like tropical fruit, others note hints of grape or rose.

If you’ve tried them before, please let us know in the comments what you think they taste like!

You won’t need to worry about protecting your crops with netting since birds won’t typically go after the colorless fruits, but you may want to lay out some shade covers to prevent sunburn.

A close up of a ripe fruit of the 'Alpine White Soul' strawberry plant hanging on the plant with light green foliage fading to soft focus in the background.

‘Alpine White Soul’

These vigorous everbearing plants produce white flowers, and they do best in full sun in Zones 6-8. They have a prostrate growth habit, with a height of 8-10 inches at maturity and a spread of 14-18 inches.

Plants are available from Burpee.

All three types of alpine strawberries described above are also available as live plants in a convenient 3-pack. You can find Burpee’s Alpine Collection here.

7. Berries Galore Pink Hybrid

Mature in 75 days, this hybrid everbearing variety produces sweet, medium-sized, pinkish-red fruit that can typically be harvested every three days or so throughout the season.

A close up of a hanging basket containing a strawberry plant of the 'Berries Galore' variety with bright green foliage and small developing fruits. To the bottom right of the frame is a circular logo and black text.

‘Berries Galore Pink Hybrid’

This type is hardy in Zones 5-9 with large, early, pink flowers. It has a height of 6-12 inches at maturity and a spread of 18 inches.

Packages of 100 seeds are available from True Leaf Market.

8. Camarosa

An early midseason June-bearing cultivar, ‘Camarosa’ does well in warmer climates. In fact, this type is well-adapted to southern California in particular, and other hot areas at low latitudes.

Large and flat wedge-shaped fruits, similar to those you will often see at the grocery store, have a firm texture and good flavor.

A cross of ‘Douglas’ and ‘Cal 85.281-605’ bred at the University of California and released in 1992, it’s a relatively heat-tolerant variety, but best grown in Zones 5-8.

A close up of the red ripe fruit of the 'Camarosa' variety pictured in bright sunshine.

‘Camarosa’

‘Camarosa’ produces white flowers and loves full sun. Mature plants reach a height of 10-12 inches with a spread of 8-12 inches and a prostrate growth habit.

Plants are available from Burpee.

9. Chandler

A midseason June-bearing cultivar, ‘Chandler’ produces firm, large, flavorful berries with that classic conical shape that you know and love.

Best suited to full sun conditions in Zones 5-8, this cultivar has a prostrate growth habit with a mature height of 6-8 inches and a spread of 12-18 inches. Bred at the University of California and released in 1983, this is a cross between ‘Douglas’ and ‘Cal 72.361-105.’

A close up of the bright red ripe fruit of the 'Chandler' variety of strawberries.

‘Chandler’

‘Chandler’ produces good yields in southern states, and it is adaptable to eastern regions of the US as well. It has white flowers, and it’s also worth noting that this cultivar is susceptible to anthracnose disease.

Plants are available from Burpee.

10. Charlotte

You’ll appreciate multiple harvests of sweet berries from June through first frost in the fall with this everbearing variety, even during the heat of the summer. And pollinators love the magenta-pink flowers.

This cultivar has good cold tolerance, and is tolerant of mites and powdery mildew as well.

A French cross between ‘Mara des Bois’ and ‘Cal 19,’ ‘Charlotte’ is a vigorous grower that does best in full sun in Zones 3-8.

‘Charlotte’

It reaches a mature height of 8-10 inches with a spread of 8-12 inches. Five hundred chill hours are required for good yields, and you can expect 75 days to harvest.

Seeds in packs of 350 are available for sale via Amazon.

11. Delizz

Noteworthy as the first strawberry to be chosen as an All-America Selections Winner back in 2016, this type is great for growing in containers.

Very sweet, medium-sized conical berries grow on strong stems – so they won’t fall off before they’re ripe.

This day-neutral hybrid produces white flowers. Best suited to full sun locations in Zones 3-8, this cultivar has a mounding habit, with a height and spread of 10-24 inches.

A close up of a strawberry plant of the 'Delizz' variety growing in a container with dark green foliage, white flowers, and some ripe red fruits.

‘Delizz’

A true F1 hybrid, ‘Delizz’ strawberry seeds grow true, meaning this is a good candidate for seed saving if that’s something you’d like to try.

Plants are available from Burpee and Home Grown Seeds has packages of 225 available via Amazon.

12. Delizzimo

If you’re looking for fruit that’s ready for harvest early in the season right through to early fall, ‘Delizzimo’ does not disappoint.

A black plastic container containing ripe red 'Delizzimo' strawberries pictured close up.

‘Delizzimo’

With small, white flowers, this compact everbearing variety has a mounding habit, and it’s known for high yields of fruit with a sweet flavor. Grow it in full sun in Zones 3-8. Plants have a height and spread of 10-24 inches at maturity.

Plants are available from Burpee.

13. Earliglow

Possibly the earliest cultivar to produce a harvest during the growing season, ‘Earliglow’ is an early-season June-bearing variety. It produces high yields of sweet, medium-sized, cone-shaped berries with a firm texture, so they’ll hold up to processing and freezing.

A close up of a ripe red fruit of the 'Earliglow' strawberry variety set on a wooden surface on a soft focus background.

With a height of 12 inches and a spread of 24-36 inches at maturity, and a prostrate growth habit, this cultivar grows best in full sun in Zones 4-8. With excellent resistance to red stele, and moderate resistance to root rot and verticillium wilt, this type is regarded as a good option for beginners.

Fragrant white flowers are attractive to pollinators, and it has a mounded habit.

A close up of a white bowl containing bright red 'Earliglow' strawberries in light sunshine.

‘Earliglow’

For the best harvest, 500 chill hours are required. Berry size tends to decrease as the season progresses.

Plants and bare roots ready for planting are available from Burpee. Bare root plants in packages of 25 are also available from Gurney’s via Home Depot.

14. Elan

A late season everbearing variety that produces yields from July to October, shiny biconical berries are known for being easy to pick – the calyx breaks easily when fruits are ripe.

A close up of 'Elan' strawberries growing in the garden, with bright red ripe fruit alongside light white unripe fruits. The background is foliage in soft focus.

Another F1 hybrid, ‘Elan’ grows true to seed and has white flowers.

A close up of a glass bowl containing the ripe fruit of the 'Elan' strawberry variety.

‘Elan’

Grow these vigorous plants in full sun in Zones 5-8. You can expect a height of 8-10 inches and spread of 14-18 inches at maturity, with a prostrate growth habit.

Plants are available from Burpee.

15. Eversweet

With cone-shaped berries that are particularly flavorful, this cultivar is known for being exceptionally heat tolerant.

A close up of one bright red ripe 'Eversweet' strawberry set on a straw mulch surface with one small unripe fruit to the left, fading to soft focus in the background.

In fact, it was bred specifically for growing in the southeastern US. Expect the best yields in full sun locations in Zones 5-8. It does well in containers and small spaces, and is even known for producing quality fruit in its first year.

Two hands cupping three bright red, ripe 'Eversweet' fruits.

This everbearing variety has white flowers, and plants reach a height of 12-16 inches with an equal spread at maturity.

‘Eversweet’

Deer and disease resistant, it has no chill hour requirements and a prostrate growth habit. Expect 90 days to harvest.

Bare root plants in packages of 25 are available from Burpee and from Gurney’s via Home Depot , or from Van Zyverden in packages of 20 via Home Depot.

16. Evie-2

If you just can’t get enough strawberries throughout the growing season, you can expect three crops of flavorful fruit in the spring, summer, and fall with this day-neutral cultivar. Developed by Edward Vinson Ltd. in the UK and released in 2006, this cross of ‘Everglade’ and ‘J92D12’ is best grown in full sun in Zones 4-8.

‘Evie-2’ is less sensitive to warm summer temperatures than other day-neutral varieties that may produce a smaller summertime harvest, with a prostrate growth habit. In fact, it’s known for producing one of the highest yields of all the day-neutral cultivars.

A close up of the red ripe 'Evie-2' strawberries set on a wicker surface.

‘Evie-2’

This type produces white flowers. Expect a mature height of 12-15 inches and a spread of 12-24 inches.

Packages of 25 bare root plants are available from Burpee.

17. Flavorfest

A mid-season June-bearing variety developed by the USDA’s Agriculture Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland and released in 2012, this one’s big on flavor with high yields of large, plump berries.

A close up of a small white flower with a yellow center with foliage in soft focus in the background.

Vigorous plants with white flowers are known for responding well to propagation, and they’re resistant to red stele and resistant or tolerant of most stem and leaf diseases known to plague strawberries. ‘Flavorfest’ is not susceptible to anthracnose crown and fruit rot.

Grown in full sun in containers or beds, ‘Flavorfest’ has a prostrate growth habit, with a height and spread of 12-16 inches at maturity. It’s best suited to the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern regions of the US in Zones 4-7.

A close up of a blue bowl containing the red fruits of the 'Flavorfest' strawberries.

‘Flavorfest’

For the best yields, 600 chill hours are required, with only 30 days to harvest.

Plants and bare roots ready for planting are available from Burpee.

18. Galletta

A super hardy and vigorous cultivar that’s particularly disease resistant, this option is excellent for organic gardeners. You won’t have to worry about black root rot, black vine weevils, or red stele with ‘Galletta.’ And it can be grown in heavy soil as well.

An ‘Earliglow’ and ‘NCH 87-22’ cross developed by Jim Ballington at North Carolina State University and released in 2010, this is an early-season June-bearing cultivar with white flowers and large, firm, aromatic berries.

A close up of the 'Galetta' strawberries growing on the plant set on a straw background.

‘Galletta’

Best in Zones 4-7 in full sun, particularly in the Piedmont and Mountain regions of North Carolina, you can expect a height and spread of 12-16 inches at maturity and a prostrate growth habit.

Bare root plants are available from Burpee.

19. Grande Berried Treasure Red

With stunning rose-colored semi-double flowers, trailing runners, and medium-sized red berries, this is an excellent option for containers.

A close up of a 'Grande Berried Treasure' with bright red flowers, and developing fruits with green foliage in the background in soft focus.

Grow it in full sun in Zones 4-9.

You can expect a height of 12-16 inches and spread of 18-24 inches at maturity.

A close up of a metal colander with bright red 'Grande Berried Treasure' strawberries spilling out onto a wooden surface, with bright red flowers in the background.

‘Grande Berried Treasure Red’

This type has a mounded habit, no chill hour requirements, and you can expect about 28 days to harvest.

Live plants are available in 4-packs from Proven Winners via Home Depot.

20. Honeoye

This cultivar was developed at Cornell University by plant breeders at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) and released in 1979. A cross of ‘Vibrant’ and ‘Holiday,’ it was a top seller for decades, and remains popular among growers today.

A close up of the ripe fruits of the Honeoye strawberries with bright green tops still attached.

Early midseason June-bearing plants produce white flowers and very high yields of medium-sized, bright red berries. These are known for their relatively firm texture and for holding their color in processing, so they’re great for home canning.

Grow ‘Honeoye’ in full sun in Zones 3-9. This type is relatively adaptable, but it does best when planted in loamy, light soil and makes a lovely addition to raised beds. You can expect a maximum height of 8-10 inches with a spread of 12 inches.

A close up of a wooden container with the red fruit of the 'Honeoye' variety spilling out onto a blue surface.

‘Honeoye’

Unfortunately, this cultivar does not exhibit any particular types of soil disease resistance, and it is susceptible to black root rot.

Bare root plants in packages of 25 are available from Gurney’s via The Home Depot.

21. Jewel

Producing large, juicy, wedge-shaped berries with a solid red hue inside and out, ‘Jewel’ berries are known for freezing well, and harvested fruit resists rotting in storage.

This late midseason June-bearing variety has fruit that’s easy to pick, with a low-growing prostrate habit, a max height of 12 inches, and a spread of 24-36 inches.

Developed at Cornell/NYSAES and released in 1985, ‘Jewel’ is a cross of ‘Senga Sengana’ and ‘NYE58’ with ‘Holiday.’

Best grown in full sun in Zones 4-8, plants are moderately winter hardy. This cultivar is susceptible to leaf spot, red stele, powdery mildew, black root rot, and verticillium wilt.

A close up of a wicker basket containing 'Jewel' fruits, surrounded by green foliage, with a white flower to the right of the frame, pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

‘Jewel’

It’s not the toughest variety out there, but with a little extra TLC, you’ll love its pinkish white flowers and tasty fruit. Provide 500 chill hours for best yields, and expect 75 days to harvest.

Plants and bare roots are available from Burpee.

22. Mara Des Bois

This is a day-neutral French variety first introduced by plant breeder Jacques Marionnet in 1991, a cross between ‘Gento’ and ‘Osara’ with ‘Red Gauntlet’ and ‘Korona’ that’s great for growing in containers or raised beds. You’ll love the small-to-medium-sized, sweet, conical berries that this cultivar produces.

Yields are sure to be plentiful from June until first frost, if grown in full sun in Zones 4-8. In fact, this type is sometimes said to be the most flavorful and aromatic of all cultivars.

A close up of the ripe fruit of the 'Mara Des Bois' variety still attached to the plant with bright green foliage, set on a gray surface.

‘Mara Des Bois’

‘Mara Des Bois’ has a prostrate habit and produces white flowers, with a mature height of 12-15 inches and spread of 12-24 inches.

Packages of 25 bare root plants are available from Burpee.

23. Mignonette

This heirloom French F. vesca cultivar has white flowers and tiny, sweet, gourmet-quality berries. The bushy, runnerless plants are great for growing in containers in Zones 4-9, in full sun conditions.

A close up of a terra cotta pot containing a bushy 'Mignonette' plant with bright green foliage, white flowers and ripe red fruits.

With a height of just 6-8 inches and a spread of 12 inches, this is an everbearing variety with a somewhat mounded growth habit that’s perfect for smaller spaces.

A close up of a small red ripe fruit of the 'Mignonette' plant set on a green soft focus background.

‘Mignonette’

Frost tolerant, this type also exhibits resistance to fungal disease.

Seeds in packages of 125 are available from Burpee.

24. Montana

Its extra-large, showy white flowers are attractive to pollinators. And trailing runners bearing conical, medium-sized fruits make this hybrid cultivar excellent for containers and hanging baskets.

With a compact mounding habit, this everbearing variety can reach a height and spread of 10-24 inches, if given the room. Growth is fast, once this cultivar becomes established.

A close up of a terra cotta pot containing a 'Montana' strawberry plant growing in the kitchen with fruit hanging over the side of the pot, white flowers at the top of the plant and bread in a white bowl to the right of the frame.

‘Montana’

‘Montana’ does best in full sun in Zones 3-8. Expect 75 days to harvest, and provide 500 chill hours for the best yields.

Plants are available from Burpee.

25. Ozark Beauty

Developed by J. B. Winn in Arkansas and released in 1955, this best-selling cultivar is a cross between ‘Red Rich’ and ‘Twentieth Century.’

With a large initial yield of extra-large, sweet, and juicy fruit, berries have a uniform shape and can grow up to 4 inches in size. Smaller harvests follow throughout the growing season.

This everbearing variety is a vigorous grower that’s resistant to leaf spot and leaf scorch. But on the other hand, ‘Ozark Beauty’ is susceptible to red stele, verticillium wilt, and anthracnose.

Expect a height of 6-8 inches and spread of 12-24 inches at maturity. You can grow this type in full sun in Zones 4-8, or push your luck and give it a try in Zones 3 and 9.

This cultivar is known for being highly adaptable. It is well-suited to northern climates and locations at a higher elevation in the south. It’s also very cold hardy if well cared for, reportedly able to survive low temperatures of -30°F.

A close up of the red fruit of the 'Ozark Beauty' strawberry cultivar, set on a wooden surface, fading to soft focus in the background.

‘Ozark Beauty’

Since this cultivar loves the cold, it’s not surprising that 1000 chill hours are required for the best yields. With a mounded habit, ‘Ozark Beauty’ requires 90 days to harvest, and white, fragrant flowers are attractive to pollinators.

Bare root plants in packages of 10 or 25 are available from Gurney’s via Home Depot.

26. Purple Wonder

Strawberries are red, and sometimes white, occasionally yellow, and maybe even a little pinkish… right?

Well, get ready because this is the first-ever purple variety!

A close up of the dark red, almost purple fruit of the 'Purple Wonder' variety, set on a wooden surface, with foliage in soft focus in the background.

‘Purple Wonder’ is a June-bearing type bred by Courtney Weber at Cornell University and released in 2012. The sweet and flavorful berries are a standout with their bold, deep color that appears throughout the fruit, inside and out.

Best grown in full sun in Zones 4-8 with a prostrate growth habit, ‘Purple Wonder’ will reach a mature height of 8-12 inches and spread of 10-12 inches.

A close up of the fruit of the 'Purple Wonder' strawberry cultivar in a yellow ceramic bowl set on a wooden surface.

‘Purple Wonder’

These don’t produce many runners and they’re excellent for growing in containers.

Plants are available exclusively from Burpee.

27. Ruby Ann

If you’re a fan of huge yields and your aim is to grow your berries in hanging baskets, give this cultivar a try.

A close up of the 'Ruby Ann' flower, with bright pink petals and a yellow center, pictured in bright sunshine on a soft focus background.

‘Ruby Ann’ is a looker, with large, deep red flowers and bountiful ruby-red fruit on trailing runners. Best grown in Zones 3-8, this everbearing cultivar has a mounding habit and it does best in full sun.

A close up of a black pot, containing a 'Ruby Ann' strawberry cultivar, with bright red flowers, and fruit hanging over the side of the container. The pot is set on a blue wooden surface in the kitchen with bread on a chopping board to the right of the frame.

‘Ruby Ann’

Expect a height and spread at maturity of 10-24 inches.

Plants are available from Burpee.

28. Rutgers Scarlet

A June-bearing variety named for the university breeding program from whence it came and released in 2015, this Jersey type is juicy with a particularly delicious sweet-tart flavor, and it was “solely developed for fresh picking.”

Best in Zones 5-8, with a mounding habit and white flowers, grow ‘Rutgers Scarlet’ in full sun for the best yields.

A close up of a 'Rutgers Scarlet' fruit, set on a wooden surface, on a bright soft focus background.

‘Rutgers Scarlet’

You can expect this type to reach a height of 8-10 inches and spread of 10-24 inches at maturity.

Plants are available from Burpee.

29. Seascape

A high yielding day-neutral plant that does well in a variety of soil types, ‘Seascape’ has a prostrate habit with large, conical, bright red berries that weigh about 2 ounces each.

A close up of a wooden bowl containing the red fruit of the 'Seascape' variety in a wooden bowl, with green foliage in the background, set on a rustic wooden surface.

Developed at the University of California and released in 1991, peak production for this cross between ‘Selva’ and ‘Douglas’ can be expected in August and September. But according to Burpee, ‘Seascape’ will start fruiting about 3 months after you get it in the ground, regardless of what date you choose to plant.

Heat tolerant and very resistant to disease, this cultivar does best in full sun in Zones 4-8, and it’s known as a favorite among growers in California and the northeastern regions of the US. It is moderately susceptible to leaf rot.

A close up, top down picture of a wooden bowl containing the bright red ripe fruit of the 'Seascape' strawberry cultivar, set on a wooden surface.

‘Seascape’

With a height and spread of 12 inches by 23-36 inches, this type will also do well in containers, and fragrant white flowers are attractive to pollinators. You can expect 90 days to harvest, and 500 chill hours are required.

Packages of 25 bare root plants are available from Burpee.

And if you want to keep strawberry season going in your garden for as long as possible, Burpee offers an All Season Collection of ‘Earliglow,’ ‘Jewel,’ and ‘Seascape’ bare root plants in packages of 25 each.

30. Sweet Charlie

Bred at the University of Florida Gulf Coast Research and Education Center with growers in the southern states in mind, this June-bearing early-season cultivar is known for its high yields of super sweet and flavorful medium-sized berries with a firm texture.

A bright green plastic planting pot containing a 'Sweet Charlie' plant with ripe and unripe strawberries hanging down the side. To the right and left are pots containing different herbs on a bright background.

Expect 1-2 pints of fruit per plant, with larger berries produced at the beginning of the season. ‘Sweet Charlie’ is also known to provide a second crop of large fruit at the very end of the season in some years.

These vigorous plants have a prostrate growth habit, and with a height of 12 inches and spread of 12-20 inches at maturity, they can be grown in containers. Best planted in full sun in Zones 5-8, ‘Sweet Charlie’ is a cross of ‘FL 80-856’ and ‘Pajaro.’

A close up background picture of bright red 'Sweet Charlie' strawberries.

‘Sweet Charlie’

Highly resistant to Collectotrichum acutatum anthracnose fruit rot, this cultivar is also resistant to Phomopsis fruit rot, crown rot, two-spotted spider mites, and powdery mildew. But unfortunately, this type is susceptible to leaf blight and Botrytis fruit rot.

Plants are available from Burpee.

31. Sweet Kiss

High summertime yields with large, wedge-shaped berries on small plants? Yes, please!

A close up of a large tall terra cotta pot containing a trailing green plant of the 'Sweet Kiss' variety with soil in the background.

‘Sweet Kiss’ is perfect for growing in containers in full sun in Zones 5-8.

A close up of a single red fruit of the 'Sweet Kiss' strawberry cultivar, with green foliage surrounding it on a soft focus background.

‘Sweet Kiss’

With a prostrate habit, this everbearing cultivar maxes out at 10 inches in height (usually somewhere closer to 6-8 inches) with a spread of 12-16 inches.

Bare root plants in packages of 25 are available from Burpee.

The Three Great Strawberries Collection from Burpee also features this cultivar, along with ‘Earliglow’ and ‘AC Wendy’ in packages of 25 bare root plants each.

32. Toscana

A standout known for its fruit as well as its flowers, this everbearing variety from Dutch breeding company ABZ Seeds has tons of ornamental value, with deep rose-colored flowers, a lush prostrate habit, and sweet, small, dark red fruit.

A close up of the 'Toscana' strawberry plant with bright pink flowers set against bright green foliage with water droplets on the leaves.

‘Toscana’ was a winner of the 2011 FleuroStar Award granted by Fleuroselect. And this F1 hybrid is frost tolerant and great for self-sowing.

Plant it in containers or hanging baskets, in full sun or partial shade, to decorate your outdoor space in Zones 4-9.

A close up of a white ceramic bowl containing 'Toscana' strawberries, set on a wooden chopping board with a glass of orange juice in the background.

‘Toscana’

Expect a mature height of 8-12 inches and spread of 12-16 inches.

Plants are available from Burpee, and seeds in packages of 300 are also available via Amazon.

33. Tristan

Another cultivar with equally impressive ornamental and edible value, ‘Tristan’ has deep rose-colored blooms and bright red berries.

A close up of a 'Tristan' plant with bright green foliage, a small pink flower and ripening strawberries with soil in the background.

These compact everbearing plants are known for being plagued with few problems, so they’re great for beginners. And kids will delight in harvesting their own sweet, homegrown berries.

Best grown in full sun in Zones 5-8, this type features a prostrate growth habit.

A close up of the freshly harvested fruit of the 'Tristan' strawberry cultivar, with a bright pink flower at the top of the frame.

‘Tristan’

With a mature height of 8-10 inches and spread of 14-18 inches, ‘Tristan’ is perfect for growing in containers as well as beds.

Plants are available from Burpee.

34. White Pineberry

You’ve probably seen photos of these floating around the internet, and they’re not a hoax. In fact, white pineberries are becoming incredibly popular among growers today!

A close up of the harvested fruits of the 'Pineberry' strawberry plant which are creamy white with small pink spots, in a glass bowl set on a pink checked surface.

Dutch breeder Hans de Jongh developed this type from French source stock, and it was released in 2009. Known for their white color and red seeds, F. virginiana x chiloensis ‘White Pineberry’ is almost like an inside-out or photo negative version of your typical strawberry.

Deer resistant, this unique cultivar is aromatic with a mild pineapple flavor, and it produces white flowers. No chill hours are required, and you can expect your first harvest in the second year.

Since they are only partially self-pollinating, another cultivar (such as ‘Quinalt’) are often also included with purchase to cross-pollinate and increase yields. Even though these two types differ in appearance, they won’t develop hybridized fruit. Just keep in mind that seeds planted from either variety will not grow true to seed if they were cross-pollinated.

‘White Pineberry’ and ‘Quinalt’

Both are everbearing, vigorous varieties that produce lots of unrooted runners – so they’re great for hanging planters – and ‘Quinalt’ produces red fruit.

Grow ‘White Pineberry’ in full sun in Zones 5-8 and expect a mature height of 10 inches.

Packages of 20 bare root plants are available from Van Zyverden via The Home Depot or via Amazon.

35. Whopper

If you’re looking for an impressively large strawberry, you’ve come to the right place! ‘Whopper’ produces berries that rival peaches in size, and these plants are extremely hardy and eager to multiply.

Square image of two hands holding a peach and a 'Whopper' strawberry to compare their size.

‘Whopper’

Unlike some of the other larger cultivars, these are known for being sweet and juicy (because, as we all know, size isn’t the only thing that matters when it comes to homegrown fruit!).

This June-bearing cultivar is disease-resistant, hardy in Zones 5-10 with a mature height of 8-10 inches and spread of 8-12 inches. With a medium growth rate, plants produce white flowers, and you can expect yields of 1-3 pints of fruit per plant.

Bare root plants are available in packs of 40 from Gurney’s via The Home Depot, or in packs of 10.

A Berry Patch Full of Luscious Fruit

In addition to several raspberry bushes, my grandpop always had a few strawberry plants growing in the beds alongside his house, and my uncle Norm actually grew up to be a strawberry farmer. A passion for berries runs deep in my family.

A close up of bright red, ripe strawberries hanging from the branch on a soft focus background.

Who knows – maybe planting a few of these tasty cultivars will encourage the children in your life to develop a love of the land as well, pursuing careers in the agricultural sciences or growing into green-thumbed gardeners themselves, proud of their homegrown harvests.

Whether you crave just a few tasty and colorful berries each summer, continual harvests throughout the season, or a big batch of berries bursting with juice that you can pick for an all-hands-on-deck canning session, we hope you’ll find exactly what you’re looking for among our favorites.

What’s your go-to strawberry cultivar? Any suggestions to share? We love hearing from our readers – feel free to drop us a line in the comments below!

And if you want to learn even more about growing your own berries at home, take a look at these guides next:

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Originally published on February 22, 2020. Last updated: March 9, 2020 at 17:09 pm. Product photos via Amazon, Bonnie Plants, Burpee, Home Depot, Home Grown Seeds, and True Leaf Market. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock.

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About Allison Sidhu

Allison M. Sidhu grew up with her hands in the dirt in southeastern Pennsylvania, and she is now based in sunny LA. She holds a BA in English literature from Swarthmore College as well as an MA in gastronomy from Boston University. When she’s not in the kitchen making a fresh green juice or whipping up something tasty for dinner, Allison enjoys perusing the latest seed catalogs, tending her patio garden, and reading up on the latest in food and agriculture policy.

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