How to Identify and Control Peach Twig Borers

A close up horizontal image image of an orchard growing a variety of fruits on a cloudy sky background.

Peach twig borers (Anarsia lineatella) start by infesting the shoots of stone fruit and almond trees, moving on to the fruit once it matures. These insects can cause serious losses, and aggressive control measures may be necessary to eradicate them. Read on to learn how to identify and control this pernicious garden pest.

How to Diagnose and Prevent Phony Peach Disease

Close up of small peaches infected with Xylella fastidiosa that cause phony peach disease.

Every type of peach (as well as almond and apricot) is susceptible to phony peach disease, which results in compact bushy trees that stop producing fruit. There is no cure, and you will have to destroy your tree if it’s infected. Read more now to find out how you can prevent this insidious disease from affecting your home orchard.

How to Prevent Rhizopus Rot of Stone Fruits

Close up of three yellow peaches showing signs of rhizopus rot.

Apricot soft rot caused by Rhizopus is a very serious infection that can destroy all your ripe peaches, apricots, nectarines, or plums . However, you can take steps to minimize the chances of your stone fruits from being infected. Read on to learn how to prevent Rhizopus rot in your harvest.

How to Manage Root Rot in Fruit, Nut, and Landscape Trees and Shrubs

Tree roots infected with root rot.

Phytophthora and the fungi Armillaria, Phymatotrichum, and Xylaria can all cause devastating cases of root rot on fruit, nut, and landscape trees along with woody shrubs. Prevention is the best way to manage these diseases. Read on to learn the best ways to avoid these diseases and biocontrol agents and fungicides that may help with Phytophthora root rot.

How to Identify and Control Cotton Root Rot in Fruit and Nut Trees

Dead fruit trees killed from cotton root rot (Phymatotrichum omnivorum) in an orchard setting.

Cotton root rot infects more than 2,300 plant species in the southwest, including apples, peaches, almonds, and most other fruit and nut trees. While the disease is usually fatal, there are some steps you can take that might save your tree. Read on at Gardener’s Paths to find what to do if your tree has this disease.

How to Identify, Prevent, and Treat Gummosis on Fruit Trees

Close up of gummosis on an apricot tree trunk.

Is your apricot, peach, plum, cherry, or apple tree oozing a lot of gum? If so, it may be infected with the fungus Leucostoma that causes apricot gummosis and cankers. This fungus only infects stressed trees and enters through wounds, so you may be able to avoid it entirely. Read more about how to prevent this disease and ways to treat it.

Give the Gift of Fruit: How to Grow Peach Trees

How to grow peach trees | GardenersPath.com

Does the thought of fresh-picked, sweet, juicy peaches make your mouth water? Check out this grower’s guide from Gardener’s Path and learn how to select the best tree for your area, how to care for it and how to get a bountiful crop of summer’s tastiest golden orbs — ready to be crafted into cobblers and preserves.