How to Plant A Southern Fall Vegetable Garden

Gardener using a shovel to turn over soil.

Learn all about how and when to plant a southern fall vegetable garden, and enjoy homegrown produce well into fall and winter, when your northern friends can’t even see their soil underneath all the snow. Plus, get expert tips on which plants you’re likely to have success with in autumn.

How to Protect Your Produce Against Bacterial Soft Rot

A farmer holds up a freshly dug potato showing an oozy bacterial soft rot mess on the inside of the tuber.

While you may think of potatoes when you think of soft rot, these bacterial diseases destroy a range of plants – from broccoli to tomatoes. There is no cure once your produce is infected, but there are steps you can take to prevent infection. Read on to learn how to protect your stored crops against bacterial soft rot.

12 Easy Ways to Extend the Harvest Season

Not quite ready to put your garden to bed for the season? Learn how to keep your garden growing strong all through the fall, and enjoy the benefit of fresh garden produce for longer than ever this year. Use our guide to check out some fun and easy ways to extend the harvest season. Read more now.

15 Creative Uses for Bricks in Landscape and Garden Design

A loose brick retaining wall without mortar, with herbs and potted plants growing inside, with several terra cotta pots and a pair of secateurs on top.

If you have a pile of bricks left over from a building project, you’ll love these 15 ideas for using them in the outdoor landscape. Durability and traditional style make bricks a timeless choice for pathways, edging, and so much more. Find functional and decorative design inspiration, right here on Gardener’s Path.

Stop Watering Unnecessarily: How to Use a Rain Gauge

A decorative rain gauge with a clear canister that is almost full of water, market with measurements in inches and centimeters, with a green resin frog sitting in a brown Adirondack chair and reading a blue book beneath a pink umbrella, set on a cement surface with rain gently falling on a cloudy day.

It’s all too easy to overwater your garden without realizing it – until it’s too late. Cheap and easy to use, rain gauges can help. An inch of rain a week can spare you an unnecessary watering session, saving you time and money, and protecting your plants from too much of a good thing. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.