Grow Crunchy, Sweet Bell Peppers in Your Own Backyard

To large red bell peppers growing on a plant with broad green leaves.

Growing bell peppers in your own garden is beyond rewarding. Sweet yet savory, crunchy, and versatile, they’re delicious at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. And the amazing varieties you get to choose from when you grow your own will motivate you to keep growing bell peppers year after year. Learn more on Gardener’s Path.

How to Grow Chives, and Why You Need To

The frame is filled with blooming green chives with pink and purple flowers.

Chives are a must for any gardener. They’re beautiful, edible, low-maintenance butterfly magnets. And these hardy perennials are sure to return year after year. From the kitchen windowsill to a formal border to a rustic cottage garden, chives offer the best of both form and function. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.

The Ultimate Guide to Growing Strawberries at Home

Two vibrant red strawberries hang from skinny stems towards the brown earth, growing on a plant in the sunshine with green leaves.

It’s really sad when you purchase a good-looking batch of strawberries only to find them bland, tart, or worse – nothing but mush. Have you tried growing your own? As a cold hardy perennial, you’ll be surprised how little is involved in growing a plant or two for some delicious snacking. Read more on Gardener’s Path.

How to Be Successful with Your Lettuce Patch

A woman's hand is about to pluck green ruffled baby lettuce leaves from a garden patch.

Need help getting your lettuce patch up to snuff? Give our detailed guide a read for the best tips to grow leaf and head types in veggie patches, raised beds, and containers, everything from arugula to romaine. We cover seed starting and planting tips, watering and fertilization requirements, how to harvest, and more.

Why Buy Sweet Potatoes When Growing Your Own Is So Easy?

Light green leaves of a sweet potato vine, growing on a brown cedar fence.

Sweet potatoes are the healthy root vegetable that everyone loves. They suit any meal, and roasting turns transforms them into a caramelized, nutritious treat. Would you believe they’re one of the easiest annual edibles to grow? Just imagine what they taste like freshly harvested. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.

Stop Watering Unnecessarily: How to Use a Rain Gauge

A decorative rain gauge with a clear canister that is almost full of water, market with measurements in inches and centimeters, with a green resin frog sitting in a brown Adirondack chair and reading a blue book beneath a pink umbrella, set on a cement surface with rain gently falling on a cloudy day.

It’s all too easy to overwater your garden without realizing it – until it’s too late. Cheap and easy to use, rain gauges can help. An inch of rain a week can spare you an unnecessary watering session, saving you time and money, and protecting your plants from too much of a good thing. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.

Planting Parsnips: One Taste and You’ll Want to Grow Your Own

Four dirt-covered parsnips arranged in a row on brown soil in bright sunshine.

Hardy parsnips, a root crop similar to carrots, can be harvested throughout fall and winter. Slightly sweet and rich in flavor, they’ll liven up soups, stews, and casseroles. To find out everything you need to know to grow this delicious but underutilized vegetable in your garden, read more now on Gardener’s Path.

Enjoy Homegrown Raspberries for Decades to Come

Closely cropped extreme closeup of four red raspberries growing on a plant with green leaves, and a green and brown background in soft focus.

Are you intimidated by the idea of growing fruit? Don’t be – raspberries are easy-to-grow perennials that will thrive throughout most of the US. With a bit of pruning, they’re adaptable and come back year after year, providing you with delicious homegrown berries for years to come. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.

The Ultimate Way to Support Tomato Plants: Florida Weave

Small tomato plants and leafy greens growing in a wooden raised bed planter filled with brown soil topped with wood chip mulch, with two rusty rebar stakes placed at either end of the bed, with twine threaded between them to create supports, with the base of a wooden deck in the background.

Looking for the best way to support your tomatoes? Using the Florida Weave, all of your plants can be supported with the same trellis. It’s easy to set up, requires very few materials, and can be used for both determinate and indeterminate varieties. Read more now on Gardener’s Path and learn how to make your own.