How to Grow Chives, and Why You Need To

The frame is filled with blooming green chives with pink and purple flowers.

Chives are a must for any gardener. They’re beautiful, edible, low-maintenance butterfly magnets. And these hardy perennials are sure to return year after year. From the kitchen windowsill to a formal border to a rustic cottage garden, chives offer the best of both form and function. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Be Successful with Your Lettuce Patch

A woman's hand is about to pluck green ruffled baby lettuce leaves from a garden patch.

Need help getting your lettuce patch up to snuff? Give our detailed guide a read for the best tips to grow leaf and head types in veggie patches, raised beds, and containers, everything from arugula to romaine. We cover seed starting and planting tips, watering and fertilization requirements, how to harvest, and more.

Stop Watering Unnecessarily: How to Use a Rain Gauge

A decorative rain gauge with a clear canister that is almost full of water, market with measurements in inches and centimeters, with a green resin frog sitting in a brown Adirondack chair and reading a blue book beneath a pink umbrella, set on a cement surface with rain gently falling on a cloudy day.

It’s all too easy to overwater your garden without realizing it – until it’s too late. Cheap and easy to use, rain gauges can help. An inch of rain a week can spare you an unnecessary watering session, saving you time and money, and protecting your plants from too much of a good thing. Read more now on Gardener’s Path.

The Ultimate Way to Support Tomato Plants: Florida Weave

Small tomato plants and leafy greens growing in a wooden raised bed planter filled with brown soil topped with wood chip mulch, with two rusty rebar stakes placed at either end of the bed, with twine threaded between them to create supports, with the base of a wooden deck in the background.

Looking for the best way to support your tomatoes? Using the Florida Weave, all of your plants can be supported with the same trellis. It’s easy to set up, requires very few materials, and can be used for both determinate and indeterminate varieties. Read more now on Gardener’s Path and learn how to make your own.