How to use Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to Control Insect Pests

A pump sprayer is being used in a backyard setting to apply Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to control insect pests.

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a microbial insecticide that is highly specific for certain kinds of insects and safe against people and non-target animals. Certain strains control caterpillars, mosquitoes, black flies, and a few kinds of beetles. Read on to learn how to use this novel but natural insecticide.

Controlling Plant Pathogens With the Biofungicide Bacillus subtilis

Close up of a graphic in green showing a microscopic view of the biofungicide bacillus subtilis.

Bacillus subtilis can control a range of fungal and bacterial pathogens in the soil and on leaves. It directly inhibits other microbes and also stimulates the plants to control pathogens using their own natural resistance mechanisms. Read on to learn more about these versatile bacteria.

Trichoderma Improves Plant Growth and Kills Fungal Pathogens

A micro view showing light green Trichoderma Fungi.

Trichoderma harzianum T-22 is a highly developed fungal strain that effectively controls a number of fungal pathogens of plants. This fungus colonizes plant roots and does not affect other beneficial microbes like mycorrhizae or Rhizobium. Read on to learn more about this fascinating organism now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Use Streptomyces lydicus to Control Fungal Plant Diseases

A microscopic vie of the Streptomyces bacteria.

The bacteria Streptomyces lydicus colonize plant roots and protect them against fungi and bacteria that cause disease. They can also be sprayed on plant leaves to control foliar pathogens. These bacteria are safe for people and beneficial insects. Read on to learn how they work and how to use them in your garden.

Use Beneficial Nematodes to Reduce Bad Bugs in Your Garden

Top down view of various beneficial nematodes view through a microscope.

Beneficial nematodes are microscopic parasitic roundworms that control soilborne insects in their larval and nymph stages. They introduce bacteria that kills their insect hosts, providing a welcome space to nurture their young. Whoops! Not a very welcome guest! Read on to learn how to use them to combat garden pests.

23 Beneficial Insects and Other Creepy Crawlies That Your Garden Will Love

Did you know that not all insects are pests? Many beneficial varieties may already be living in your gardens, helping to control populations of bugs that enjoy feasting on veggies, herbs, and flowers. Read on to discover who your friends are, and how to encourage them to work and thrive in your yard.