What’s Eating My Turnips? How to Eradicate Turnip and Rutabaga Pests

Turnip and rutabaga plants can be severely infested by several types of insects. While row covers can prevent some of these infestations, wireworms are soil-borne threats that can cause the end of the season’s crop in an infested field. Read on to learn how to manage cabbage aphids, root maggots, flea beetles, sawflies, and more.

How to Stop Turnips from Bolting and Going to Seed

Close up of a turnip forming a flower head to produce seed.

Can’t understand why your turnip crop keeps bolting? Bolting is caused by stress on plants and can be easily addressed with a few simple tricks. Learn what factors can cause bolting in turnips and explore some ways that you can prevent your turnip crop from bolting. Read more now.

What Causes Yellowing and Thinning of Kale Leaves?

Close up of kale leaves turning yellow while growing in a veggie garden.

Although kale plants are usually healthy, yellowing and thinning leaves can be signs of potentially fatal bacterial infections. These diseases rapidly spread to nearby plants and can destroy whole fields. Read on to learn how to prevent leaf spot bacteria and black rot from infecting your plants.

How to Identify and Treat Diseases of Turnips and Rutabagas

Close up of a turnip plant with diseased leaves.

Fungi, bacteria, and water molds cause multiple types of diseases on the leaves or roots of turnips and rutabagas. In addition, turnip mosaic virus is a debilitating disease. You can prevent many diseases by using clean or heat-treated seeds. Read on to find out what symptoms to look for on your crops.

How to Harvest and Store Rutabaga

Horizontal image of dusty, slightly dirt-covered, just-picked pale purple rutabagas.

How do you know when it’s time to harvest rutabaga? And what should you do with it once you’ve picked it? Head over to Gardener’s Path to learn how and when to harvest and proper storage techniques, plus we share our favorite cooking tips and recipe ideas. You’ll be astonished at how many ways rutabaga can be enjoyed.

How to Identify and Treat Turnips With Downy Mildew

Downy mildew (Peronospora parasitica) infection on a turnip leaf underside. Black background.

Cool, wet conditions favor downy mildew infection on turnips. Not only can the pathogen destroy the leaves, but it can also spread into the root and cause the turnips to crack. Fall crops are particularly susceptible to this fungus-like organism. Read on to learn how to prevent and control this disease.

How to Identify and Treat Alternaria Leaf Spot on Turnips

Close up of half a tunip leaf infected with Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria brassicicola or brassicae).

Species of the fungus Alternaria can infect your turnips, causing leaf spots and spreading to the seed pods. There are a number of methods to prevent this disease, and both microbial and synthetic fungicides that will control it. To learn how to prevent and control this disease, read more now on Gardener’s Path.

How to Identify and Control Turnip Black Rot

Close up of a turnip leave showing splotchy areas indicative ofbBlack rot (Xanthomonas campestris)

Black rot of turnips caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is a devastating bacterial disease that is easily spread. Since it is very difficult to control, preventing it from becoming established is your best bet. Read on to learn how to keep your turnips from becoming infected with black rot.

How to Grow Rutabagas: A Cool-Weather Crop Perfect for Fall

Horizontal image of three pinkish purple and white rutabagas with dirt-covered roots and green stems and leaves, laying on their side in the dirt, with more leafy greens in the background.

Do you love potatoes and carrots? Want to try growing something new in your garden this year? It’s time to add rutabaga to your list. This under-represented root vegetable is nutritious, delicious, and an excellent choice for long term storage. Best of all, it’s easy to grow your own. Read more now!

How to Identify and Prevent White Rust on Turnip

White rust (Albugo candida) on Turnips. Close up.

White rust infects cruciferous plants, including turnips, around the world. It produces white pustules on the leaves and can distort the flower heads. However, this organism does not kill the plants. Read on to learn how to prevent white rust using cultural control methods.

13 of the Best Cauliflower Varieties for the Home Veggie Garden

Green, purple, and white cauliflower heads on display.

Grow cauliflower for a healthy garden-to-table experience. Choose white snowballs, Italian greens and purples, and orange “cheddars.” Packed with antioxidants, vitamin C, and fiber, raw and cooked dishes showcase its mild, sweet-to-nutty flavor. Find the best varieties and where to buy them, here on Gardener’s Path.

Radishes: Peppery, Piquant, and Easy to Grow

Get expert tips about growing radishes in your garden | GardenersPath.com

Radishes have a unique taste with outstanding crunch. Quick to mature, the taproots are a garden staple for salads – but all parts are edible, and delicious! Get all the info you need on how to grow and enjoy these early spring veggies right here on Gardener’s Path.

Growing Kohlrabi: The Hearty, Above-Ground Root

Purple Kohlrabi growing in a veggie garden.

Don’t be intimidated by its strange appearance. Kohlrabi is the perfect aboveground root for beginning gardeners and it’s delicious, too. Learn the best planting, harvesting, and storage tips now with our our growing guide. Plus, we’ve got some bonus recipe ideas to use up your harvest! Read more now.

6 Best Types of Kale for Cold Climates

Frost on cold-hearty Lacinato kale on a cold morning. | GardenersPath.com

Kale can do very well in the coldest temperatures. See which varieties are best-suited for late fall and early winter gardens. Get growing tips for a longer harvest in our cold-weather kale growing guide on Gardener’s Path.